Prevent, Treat Alzheimer’s Disease With Smart Nutrition

Nutrition Delivers Effective Compounds To Brain

Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and other forms of brain disease are the fastest-growing causes of death in the world. Most forms of brain disease are preventable, transmissible and treatable with targeted nutrition. That’s the theme for a new book that shines light on the global epidemic of brain disease.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

According to Gary Chandler, author of Beat Brain Disease With Smart Food, Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now. Millions more will contract the disease this year, while just as many will go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

Death rates from heart disease and cancer are dropping in most countries due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management. Meanwhile, neurodegenerative disease is spreading exponentially. In the U.S., deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 71 percent from 2000 to 2013, while those attributed to heart disease decreased 14 percent. Experts suggest that the prevalence of brain disease will quadruple by 2050, if not sooner.

“Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,” said Chandler. “Many industry practices are based upon a faulty risk assessment.”

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Caregivers (spouses) are six times more likely to contract brain disease (most caregivers are women); and
  • People in Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

infectious waste and food contamination

Sewage sludge, biosolids, and reclaimed wastewater are recycling prions from victims into our food and water supplies. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds. Avoiding prions in your food and water is a critical step in wellness. Unfortunately, it’s easier said than done.

Some foods increase your risk of contracting brain disease, while some foods help prevent it. Other foods offer the best hope for effective treatment. Most drugs offer no help at all. Drug companies are making billions selling placebos. Targeted nutrition is our best hope for prevention and treatment.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Preview and order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

Learn more about treating Alzheimer’s disease http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-treatment/

Food Linked To Risk Of Acquiring Neurodegenerative Disease

Food Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease

People who eat more nuts, fish, poultry and certain fruits and vegetables have a lower risk of acquiring Alzheimer’s disease, while those who eat more red meats, organ meats, butter and high-fat dairy products have a higher risk.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

The conclusions come from a study of 2,148 adults aged over 65 published in the journal Archives of Neurology. All lived in New York and did not have dementia. They were followed for approximately four years. Their diet was studied and their dementia risk assessed every 1.5 years. Researchers found that 253 people developed Alzheimer’s disease during the study.

One dietary pattern apparently provided the best protection against the disease. Those who had a higher intake of the following foods had a lower incidence of Alzheimer’s disease:

  • salad dressing (oils)
  • nuts,
  • fish,
  • tomatoes,
  • poultry,
  • fruits,
  • dark and green leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli.

“Epidemiological evidence linking diet, one of the most important modifiable environmental factors, and risk of Alzheimer’s disease is rapidly increasing. However, current literature regarding the impact of individual nutrients or food items on Alzheimer’s disease risk is inconsistent, partly because humans eat meals with complex combinations of nutrients or food items that are likely to be synergistic,” said the researchers.

“For example, vitamin B12 and folate are homocysteine-related vitamins that may have an impact on Alzheimer’s disease via their ability of reducing circulating homocysteine levels, vitamin E might prevent Alzheimer’s disease via its strong antioxidant effect and fatty acids may be related to dementia and cognitive function through atherosclerosis, thrombosis or inflammation via an effect on brain development and membrane functioning or via accumulation of beta-amyloid (plaque).”

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Order the eBook now. We begin production on the first documentary soon. They will:

  • Help you avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Offer targeted nutritional guidance that can save lives;
  • Offer nutritional therapies that can make a difference. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutrition for neurological disease available. It also has critical aversion strategies;
  • Inform caregivers about misinformation and misdiagnoses that put them in harm’s way;
  • Blow the whistle on industry practices that are contaminating food, water and other pathways; and
  • Advocate for food safety, water quality, wellness and reforms that can save millions of lives.

Alzheimer’s Disease Nutrition via http://www.spring.org.uk/2016/01/food-types-alzheimers-disease.php

Nutrition The Best Treatment For Alzheimer’s Disease

Only Six Drugs Approved To Treat Symptoms Of Alzheimer’s Disease

There are no cures for Alzheimer’s disease and similar forms of neurodegenerative disease. There are few effective treatments to alleviate the symptoms for Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

The good news is that there are several super foods that can help us avert Alzheimer’s disease in the first place. Other super foods effectively treat the symptoms of neurodegenerative disease, which can improve functioning and quality of life as the disease progresses. Walnuts are one of those super foods.

We will discuss many more nutritional treatments for Alzheimer’s disease in our upcoming documentary, Food For Thought. We also offer vital advice to caregivers, who have a 600% greater chance of contracting the disease than the average person. Learn why. 

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Death rates from heart disease, cancer and other leading causes of death are dropping thanks to advances in medicine and disease management. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease is the one glaring exception. Death rates from Alzheimer’s disease and related forms of neurodegenerative diseases are skyrocketing.

Neurodegenerative diseases are the fastest-growing cause of death today. If we had accurate mortality statistics, we would likely find that Alzheimer’s disease is already the leading cause of death. It will continue to spread around the world—to people of all ages.

There are many factors contributing to the global surge in Alzheimer’s disease. Age and genetics play a role, but it’s smaller than you realize. Due to mismanagement and misinformation, people from some regions of the world are at a higher risk than others. Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest rates in the world. These hot spots speak of an environmental disease not one driven by age and genetics. Women contract the disease at twice the rate of men. Why?

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Hope is on the horizon. These tips can help you and your loved ones beat and treat neurological disease. Prevention is the key.

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

We need your help to push for reforms that can stop the misinformation and mismanagement that are contributing to the global Alzheimer’s disease epidemic. Please contact us to find out how you can help. Write to Gary Chandler gary@crossbow1.com

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatments Offering Hope

Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention

Scientists are making exciting headway in the search for a treatment (and even a cure) for Alzheimer’s disease. Earlier this month I joined some of the world’s preeminent physicians and neuroscientists in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference (AAIC). The six-day gathering is the largest of its kind and featured more than 100 sessions on a diverse range of Alzheimer’s disease topics.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Those sessions represent an incredible amount of new material and research to digest, so I’ve narrowed down the highlights for those of you who are interested in tracking the latest in Alzheimer’s research and drug development:

1. More and more evidence is emerging that modifying lifestyle factors can prevent or delay the onset of dementia from Alzheimer’s disease.

Investigators presented high-quality evidence demonstrating that exercise, a healthy diet, moderate alcohol consumption, education and effective management of hypertension, high cholesterol and diabetes can prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s and other dementias. In fact, the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease is actually decreasing in developed nations, where individuals are already deploying many of these lifestyle interventions.

2. Two promising immune therapies (“vaccines”) may slow cognitive decline and the course of the disease.

While Genentech’s phase-three clinical trial of an anti-amyloid antibody therapy for Alzheimer’s disease, crenezumab, failed because it did not meet its primary endpoints, an additional analysis suggested it did slow cognitive decline (by over 30 percent) in early-stage Alzheimer’s patients. Coupled with results from Lilly’s antibody therapy trial in 2012, which also showed a decrease in cognitive decline in early-stage patients, the research provides some indication that clearing amyloid at the earliest stages of the disease may benefit a subset of patients. We’ll need further research evaluating larger populations to confirm these findings, some of which is already underway.

neurodegeneration

3. We can now see Alzheimer’s tangles with brain-imaging tools.

Many physicians are currently utilizing FDA-approved brain-imaging tests to detect amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, but these plaques can be present in individuals who never develop symptoms of the disease. New imaging agents target the tangles (clumps of tau) that are the tombstones of dying neurons and are likely to be a better surrogate for tracking Alzheimer’s progression and determining the efficacy of any given drug. Researchers at the AAIC also noted that some of these imaging tools may work for related diseases that also have tangles, such as frontotemporal dementia, and could be used to assess tau pathology in the brain after a traumatic head injury.

4. Treatments that target systemic inflammation offer promise to Alzheimer’s patients.

Inflammation increases with aging, and systemic inflammation is increasingly recognized as a risk factor and a driver of Alzheimer’s disease. An analysis of data from a previous clinical trial presented at the AAIC showed that patients with markers of high inflammation in their blood responded more positively to a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment naproxen (AleveTM), while patients with low levels of inflammation were worsened by the treatment. Another study using the anti-inflammatory arthritis drug Etanercept (Enbrel), in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase-two trial, did not meet its endpoints but showed hints of stabilizing cognitive decline in a small subset population.

5. A number of new drugs to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are in development.

Lundbeck’s drug, a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist, was shown to have an added effect on cognitive function when combined with a currently approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil. A large, global phase-three study is underway to further evaluate the drug’s prospects. Unfortunately, in related news from AAIC, research on an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist drug from Forum Pharmaceuticals revealed that the drug was not significantly more effective than existing symptomatic treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/howard-fillit-md/5-reasons-to-be-optimisti_1_b_5634180.html

Help Alzheimer’s Patients With Important Dietary Choices

Editor’s Note: Food preparation is an important topic for Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers. Caregivers must assume that all cases of Alzheimer’s disease are transmissible via cups, glasses and utensils. Deadly proteins called prions are in the saliva, mucas and other bodily fluids of the victims. Prions cannot be washed away or sterilized, even in a hospital environment. Caretakers must develop their own protocols to protect themselves and others. We offer more insights and advice in our new eBook, Alzheimer’s: A Survivor’s Guide.

Food For Thought And Alzheimer’s

Regular, nutritious meals may become a challenge for people with dementia. As a person’s cognitive function declines, he or she may become overwhelmed with too many food choices, forget to eat or have difficulty with eating utensils. Proper nutrition is important to keep the body strong and healthy. For a person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, poor nutrition may increase behavioral symptoms and cause weight loss.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

The basic nutrition tips below can help boost the person with dementia’s health and your health as a caregiver, too.

  • Provide a balanced diet with a variety of foods.
    Offer vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products and lean protein foods.
  • Limit foods with high saturated fat and cholesterol.
    Some fat is essential for health — but not all fats are equal. Go light on fats that are bad for heart health, such as butter, solid shortening, lard and fatty cuts of meats.
  • Cut down on refined sugars.
    Often found in processed foods, refined sugars contain calories but lack vitamins, minerals and fiber. You can tame a sweet tooth with healthier options like fruit or juice-sweetened baked goods. But note that in the later-stages of Alzheimer’s, if loss of appetite is a problem, adding sugar to foods may encourage eating.
  • Limit foods with high sodium and use less salt.
    Most people in the United States consume too much sodium, which affects blood pressure. Cut down by using spices or herbs to season food as an alternative.

As the disease progresses, loss of appetite and weight loss may become concerns. In such cases, the doctor may suggest supplements between meals to add calories.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Staying hydrated may be a problem as well. Encourage fluids by offering small cups of water or other liquids throughout the day or foods with high water content, such as fruit, soups, milkshakes and smoothies.

During the middle and late stages of Alzheimer’s, distractions, too many choices, and changes in perception, taste and smell can make eating more difficult. The following tips can help:

  • Limit distractions.
    Serve meals in quiet surroundings, away from the television and other distractions.
  • Keep the table setting simple.
    Avoid placing items on the table — such as table arrangements or plastic fruit — that might distract or confuse the person. Use only the utensils needed for the meal.
  • Distinguish food from the plate.
    Changes in visual and spatial abilities may make it tough for someone with dementia to distinguish food from the plate or the plate from the table. It can help to use white plates or bowls with a contrasting color placemat. Avoid patterned dishes, tablecloths and placemats.
  • Check the food temperature.
    A person with dementia might not be able to tell if something is too hot to eat or drink. Always test the temperature of foods and beverages before serving.
  • Serve only one or two foods at a time.
    Too many foods at once may be overwhelming. Simplify by serving one dish at a time. For example, mashed potatoes followed by meat.
  • Be flexible to food preferences.
    Keep long-standing personal preferences in mind when preparing food, and be aware that a person with dementia may suddenly develop new food preferences or reject foods that were liked in the past.
  • Give the person plenty of time to eat.
    Remind him or her to chew and swallow carefully. Keep in mind that it may take an hour or longer to finish eating.
  • Eat together.
    Make meals an enjoyable social event so everyone looks forward to the experience. Research suggests that people eat better when they are in the company of others.
  • Keep in mind the person may not remember when or if he or she ate.
    If the person continues to ask about eating breakfast, consider serving several breakfasts — juice, followed by toast, followed by cereal.

Source: https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-food-eating.asp

More Food For Thought On Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Beneficial Oils Good For Brain, Heart

Foods rich in B12 and Omega 3 fats might lower one’s risk of acquiring Alzheimer’s disease. Coconut oil and blueberries also are beneficial. Alpha-lipoic acid supplements show early promise in clinical studies. It also helps reduce brain inflammation. University of South Florida’s Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute researchers recently received a $250,000 grant from a private foundation to conduct what is thought to be the first clinical trial of the effects of coconut oil on mild to moderate cases of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimers epidemic

New research from China indicates that melatonin supplements can prevent the development and slow the onset of dementia. Melatonin protects neurons from protein toxicity and prevents protein formations such as fibrils in the brain. Melatonin is a hormone found in plants, animals and microbes. It decreases with age within patients with Alzheimer’s.

In other dietary news, British researchers claim that sensitivity to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye, can trigger a number of neurological conditions, including dementia. (As you have noticed, protein is a common theme in this battle for the brain.) Writing in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, Dr. Marios Hadjivassilou stated, “Gluten sensitivity can be primarily, and at times exclusively, a neurological disease.”

Drugs known as anti-TNF blockers, already in use as a powerful therapy for rheumatoid arthritis, could offer hope against Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists in the U.S. showed that people with arthritis who take these drugs have a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s. One drug, Etanercept®, decreased the risk of developing the disease by 70 percent, according to Dr. Richard Chou of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. This drug targets inflammation, which might keep the body’s immune system in check and keep it from over-producing “recovery” proteins, as described earlier.

Some foods increase your risk of contracting brain disease, while some foods help prevent it. Other foods offer the best hope for effective treatment. Most drugs offer no help at all. Drug companies are making billions selling placebos. Targeted nutrition is our best hope, but we also need to know which foods to avoid.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

Stay tuned. More food for thought coming in our upcoming books and columns. 

For more information, visit www.AlzheimerSymptoms.TV