Cut Red Meat and Bad Carbs to Boost Brain Health

Dr. Oz Tackles Alzheimer’s Disease

By Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Dr. Mike Roizen, Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic.

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Q: Some people say that a diet extremely low in carbs and high in protein and fat can prevent Alzheimer’s disease. What is your opinion of this type of diet for brain health, and for general health, too?

A: First, most North Americans eat lots of processed carbs that are stripped bare of their nutrients, and that fuels obesity and unhealthy glucose levels; high levels are linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Also, these foods often are fried or combined with trans fats and added sugars, guaranteeing they’ll damage your brain and overall health. So, low-carb? For those carbs, we’d say low isn’t good enough. Banish them completely!

On the other hand, 100 percent whole grains and fiber-rich carbohydrates (fruits and vegetables) deliver nutrients that are essential for heart and immune health, digestive function and brain strength, not to mention a good sex life.

Now, about high protein: Most low-carb diets say red meat is OK. Not only do red meat and the saturated fat it contains increase your risk for cancer and stroke, eating processed red meat (bacon and sausage are big culprits) lowers sperm quality and count by 30 percent. In addition to clogging up your arteries and causing erectile problems, red meat makes whatever does happen less fertile.

However, good fats, like omega-3 fatty acids from nuts and salmon, and monounsaturated fats like extra-virgin olive oil, are beneficial for your heart, brain, skin and sex life.

But you can’t just eat your way to lifelong good health. You also need to walk 10,000 steps (or the equivalent) daily, and get 30 minutes of strength training two to three days a week. Then you’ll have a healthy life, brain power and a younger Real Age.

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About Gary Chandler

Gary Chandler is an author, advocate and strategist on health and environmental issues.
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