Is Alzheimer’s Disease Contagious

Science, Evidence Proving That Alzheimer’s A Transmissible Disease

If you think that you and your family are immune to the surging epidemic of neurodegenerative disease, think again. Neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. It’s getting worse every day thanks to mismanagement and misinformation.

Infectious proteins known as prions are involved with most forms of neurodegenerative disease. Prion disease is known in neurology as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” The global epidemic has more to do with the prion contagion than age.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. Prusiner claims that all TSEs, includingAlzheimer’s disease, are caused by prions.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs are a spectrum disease. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, which is extremely aggressive and extremely transmissible, is at the extreme end of the spectrum. Unfortunately, Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we are facing a public health disaster because of the negligence.

Neurologists are just guessing when they make a diagnosis on the prion spectrum. If the patient exhibits memory problems, they are labeled with Alzheimer’s disease. If they have a movement disorder, they are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. If the person exhibits extreme symptoms of both, they are diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). It’s far from a science. Neurologists don’t know where along the spectrum the disease becomes transmissible. The entire spectrum could represent a transmissible disease. Unfortunately, neurologists are not warning these patients and their caregivers about the risks of exposure. Even those with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are not quarantined. They are sent home, where they can infect friends, family, caregivers, clinics, dental offices, restaurants and entire communities.

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study released in early 2016 by the same scientist adds to the stack of evidence.

According to neuroscientist Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones.

Alzheimer's disease and caregivers

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions because prions are in the skin, urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva of each victim. Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. Victims are contagious long before they exhibit clinical symptoms.

At the personal level, this is very bad news for caregivers, especially spouses, who are 600 percent more likely to contract neurodegenerative disease from patients (Duke University and Utah State University). A cough, sneeze, utensils and drinking glasses all become lethal pathways. Once an item is contaminated, it’s impossible to sterilize. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. It’s reported that prions released from people are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals. Prions are not alive, so they can’t be killed.

Wastewater treatment plants are collecting points for prions from infected humans. The sewage treatment process can’t stop prions from migrating, mutating and multiplying before being discharged into the environment where they can kill again. The bad news is that the prions are being released back into the environment and dumped openly on land. The wastewater is being reclaimed and used for irrigating crops, parks, golf courses. It’s even being recycled as drinking water.

wastewater treatment plant

Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues confirmed the presence of prions in urine. Soto also confirmed that plants uptake prions and are infectious and deadly to those who consume the infected plants. Therefore, humans, wildlife and livestock are vulnerable to prion disease via plants grown on land treated with sewage sludge and reclaimed sewage water.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said.

joel pedersen prion research

“Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, wastewater treatment systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Wastewater treatment plants are now prion incubators and distributors. The prion problem is getting worse every day.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, the EPA’s risk assessment on sewage sludge and biosolids were prepared before the world of science knew about prions. The agency continues to cling to its antiquated sludge rule crafted back in the dark ages. It does, however, consider prions a “contaminant of emerging concern.” Meanwhile, its outdated risk assessments are promoting a public health disaster.

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Exposing crops and livestock to prions is a very bad idea. Plants absorb prions from the soil along with water and nutrient uptake, which makes the prions even more bioavailable and infectious to humans, wildlife and livestock.

chronic wasting disease

Unfortunately, the damage is real. Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are contracting an unstoppable prion disease now. In deer, the government calls prion disease chronic wasting disease. In cattle, prion disease is called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (they might as well call it what it is—transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). Mad cow disease is the term that most of us know. The government pretends that there is a specific prion responsible for each of these diseases. The fact is that there are thousands of mutations of prions spreading in the environment and food chain now. Some kill quickly, while some are less lethal. The only thing that we need to know is that a deadly prion is a deadly prion. There is no species barrier.

mad cow disease

If prion disease is killing these animals, livestock are not immune. Beef and dairy cattle are consuming these infected crops and the infected water supplies, too. Since humans are at the top of the food chain, and since we are often downstream from these infected farms, ranches and forests, our food and water supplies are being compromised. Wind and tornadoes transport the infectious waste even further.

So, is Alzheimer’s disease transmissible? There is absolutely no evidence to the contrary. The truth is your best defense against neurodegenerative disease. It’s time to demand reforms on many levels to safeguard caregivers, family members and our food and water supplies. Despite all of the warning signs, government and industry are insisting that we waste more time, money and lives studying these issues to death. The infection is real. The body count is real. The denial is disturbing.

Alzheimer’s Disease Research via http://crossbowcommunications.com/is-alzheimers-disease-contagious/

Alzheimer's disease public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Urine Can Diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Prions Fueling A Public Health Disaster

Urine can be used to test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Unfortunately, it also is a pathway that spreads prion disease among mammals.

infectious waste and food contamination

The Medical Research Council team is working on a simple test. They claim that their prototype test still needs honing before it could be used routinely. Currently there is no easy test available for this rare but fatal brain condition. Instead, doctors have to take a sample of spinal fluid or brain tissue, or wait for a post-mortem after death. What they look for is tell-tale deposits of abnormal proteins called prions, which cause the brain damage.

Building on earlier US work, Dr. Graham Jackson and colleagues, from University College London, have now found it is also possible to detect prions in urine. This might offer a way to diagnose CJD rapidly and earlier, they say, although there is no cure.

CJD is a rare, but fatal degenerative brain disorder caused by abnormal proteins called prions that damage brain cells. In the 1990s it became clear that a brain disease could be passed from cows to humans (it can also be passed from humans to other mammals). Since then, officials have kept a close check on how many people have become sick or died from CJD. There is no known cure.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

The study looked at urine samples from 162 people. Of these:

  • 91 were healthy controls
  • 34 had neurological disease that was not thought to be caused by CJD
  • 37 had a diagnosis of CJD (20 of these were sporadic CJD)

The urine test gave no “false-positive” results – meaning it did not falsely suggest there was CJD in any of the patients known not to have the disease. But it was less reliable when it came to detecting actual cases. It accurately detected just under half of the sporadic CJD patients and even fewer of the vCJD patients. The researchers hope they will be able to improve the test further so it can reliably detect all types of CJD.

“Although there is currently no cure for this disease, an accurate and early diagnosis is extremely important for patients and their families, said Dr. Jackson. “In the future, as trials of potential therapies become available, the earlier a patient can be diagnosed the more effective any treatment is likely to be. This test could be a critical step forward.”

Editor’s Note: Prion disease is a spectrum disease that includes Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease and is likely a contributing factor in the global rise in autism. Victims are infectious long before they exhibit symptoms. Prions are in the urine, feces, blood, saliva, mucus, skin and cell tissue of all victims–all human byproducts that are washed, dumped, or flushed down sinks and toilets. Misinformation and mismanagement of sewage and wastewater are contributing to the global epidemic in neurodegenerative disease. As more people get the disease, the waste stream becomes even deadlier. It’s time to regulate wastewater streams, including biosolids, as infectious waste and it’s time to enforce the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.

Neurodegenerative News via http://www.bbc.com/news/health-37541550?post_id=10153608943738725_10154203430888725

Sewage Sludge On Land Spreading Brain Disease

Infectious Waste Spreading Brain Disease

Brain disease is attacking record numbers of people around the world. Microcephaly in infants is part of the same scourge. The global epidemic is being fueled by infectious waste that’s contaminating our food, water, air and more. This infectious waste (biosolids) contains deadly and unstoppable neurotoxins, but it’s being spread like fertilizer in virtually every country around the world.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

In 1972, world leaders realized that dumping millions of tons of sewage sludge into the oceans killed entire underwater ecosystems. Some nations stopped the dumping immediately. Others did not.

The U.S., for example, finally passed the Ocean Dumping Ban Act of 1988. It required dumping all municipal sewage sludge and industrial waste on land. That meant dumping it into landfills or dumping it openly on land, including farms, ranches, national forests, city parks, golf courses, playgrounds, sport fields and beyond. The Act went into effect in 1992 and it sparked a public health disaster. The practice is spreading tons of pathogens into the lives of people, livestock, wildlife and beyond every day.

Landfills designed to handle these toxins are expensive. So, the dumpers hired a public relations firm to convince innocent citizens that neurotoxins and carcinogens are fertilizer. The PR firm started calling this toxic waste biosolids. It’s even sold in bags at your local home and garden store as soil for your garden and potting plants. It’s death dirt.

infectious waste

Since then, millions of tons of infectious sewage sludge have been given to farmers as fertilizer and dumped into food and water supplies around the world every year. Those farmers and ranchers are being paid to dump deadly sewage sludge on their land and shut up. Sick livestock are sold or buried as quickly as possible. Those that make it to market are consumed by people and pets, while permanently contaminating everything that they touch.

The landowners are held harmless if the sewage sludge causes damage to people or property downwind, downstream or on the dinner table. Landowners are literally making a killing with government assistance. Unfortunately, the practice of dumping extreme quantities of sewage sludge on land has created an even bigger public health problem. It’s killing people, wildlife, livestock and sea mammals downstream.

biosolids land application

Prions are infectious proteins responsible for a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible.

TSEs have a wide range of confusing names, which helps cloak this global disaster:

  • bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease) in cattle;
  • scrapie in sheep;
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans; and
  • chronic wasting disease in deer, elk, moose and reindeer.
  • badgers, mink, cats, elephants, dolphins and many other mammalian species have died from TSE. The concept of a species barrier is a myth. A deadly prion is a deadly prion. They don’t discriminate.

According to Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS and Huntington’s disease also are on the TSE spectrum. All are fatal, neurodegenerative brain diseases.

Infectious prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims, including blood, urine, mucus, saliva and feces. As such, these victims send prions to the municipal sewage treatment plant where they remain untouched.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins.”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Wastewater effluent and sewage sludge applied to land recycles prions into the environment. Once dumped on open land, prions remain infectious. Irrigation, precipitation and wind carry the prions into groundwater, streams, lakes, oceans and airways, including homes, offices and beyond.

wastewater treatment plant

Reckless wastewater treatment policies and practices are now fueling a global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among people, wildlife and livestock. In fact, Europe just reported its first case of chronic wasting disease in a reindeer in Norway. There will be many more.

The risk assessments for the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) are based on fraud and outdated information. The risk assessments were developed back in the 1970s and 1980s–before we knew about prions and other killers in modern sewage streams, including many forms of infectious medical waste. These outdated risk assessments make the entire practice illegal today under bioterrorism laws. Common sense makes them immoral and a crime against humanity.

Because of these reckless practices, it’s time to reform many laws, practices and policies. For example, it’s vital to demand testing for mad cow disease in beef cattle and hope like hell that dairy producers aren’t spreading the disease in milk, cheese and meat. Wisconsin, dairy land U.S.A., has an epidemic among wild deer. It has dumped sewage sludge in virtually every county. There is no reason to believe that the cattle are immune from the prion epidemic that’s being fueled by sick soil in Wisconsin, Colorado and beyond.

mad cow disease

There is no reliable test for live animals, yet, which means that animal health is paramount for public health. There also is no testing of crops grown in sewage sludge, despite the science that has proven that crops for humans and livestock absorb the toxins and pathogens that they are grown in–including deadly prions.

Ironically, the United States passed homeland defense laws to protect our food and water supplies from potential terrorists. Many other nations followed suit. When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. With reckless policy, the U.S. transferred responsibility for the management of select agents to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC–a private corporation that serves as the Coverup Division). These defenders of public health quietly took prions off the list of select agents because the regulation criminalized entire industries and several reckless practices. They obviously chose to defend the bottom line of corporations and the wastewater treatment industry instead of public health.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation.

Prions shed from humans are the most deadly. They demand more respect than radiation. They’re being ignored by regulators and industry alike. As such, food and water sources are being contaminated with the deadliest forms of prions. Municipal water systems can’t stop them from reaching water taps in millions of homes. Filtration doesn’t phase them.

As stated earlier, the risk assessments for biosolids, sewage sludge and reclaimed wastewater were questionable when they were developed and they are total failures now. Plus, these risk assessments do not account for the possibility of sewage sludge dumped on land going airborne via windstorms and tornadoes. These events now leave a trail of sickness and death in their wake. Airborne sewage is a killer. It dumps the toxins, pathogens and superbugs everywhere.

Valley Fever caused by land application of sewage sludge

Unfortunately, the U.S. exported these bad practices to other nations who proceeded to contaminate their food and water supplies with sewage. If hospitals can’t stop prions, neither can the brain surgeons at wastewater treatment plants.

The legislation banning ocean dumping was very explicit about the need to stop dumping potentially infectious medical waste into the oceans. Ironically, the current policy that promotes LASS ignores the risk of infectious medical waste and many other threats. It also ignores radionuclides, endocrine disruptors, birth control pills, antibiotics, flame-retardants and other toxins and superbugs. This toxic waste belongs in a lined landfill not our watersheds and food supplies. It’s time for immediate reforms.

The same sewage-borne toxins and pathogens are still contaminating our oceans. Now, they’re dumped in further upstream. Entire watersheds are now being infected—including the oceans. The body count among people, livestock and wildlife has been stacking up ever since ocean dumping began phasing out. The nightmare is worse than ever.

caregivers Alzheimer's disease

Biosolids and other forms of sewage mismanagement are now contributing to a global epidemic of neurological disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, autism, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease, microcephaly and more. Industry and governments are scrambling to blame the global epidemic on anything but contaminated soil, water, food and air. They are playing dumb in the face of fraud and scientific suppression. Negligence is too kind of a word.

Sewage sludge and reclaimed wastewater also contaminate our food with listeria, e-coli, salmonella and other killers. In fact, scientists are forced to come up with deceptive new names for the growing list of sewage-related ailments, including Zika virus, West Nile virus, epizootic hemorrhagic fever, equine herpes, valley fever and others. Industrial disease. Taxpayer dollars at work.

As mentioned earlier, crops contaminated by sewage sludge can uptake prions and deliver them throughout the plant. Crops then deliver deadly prions to mammals that consume them. In fact, infected plants are spreading prion disease to several species, including humans. When hamsters consumed infected wheat grass, the animals were infected with prion disease. Researchers also found deadly prions in plants that just made surface contact with infected urine and feces.

“These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease,” said Claudio Soto, the lead investigator from the University of Texas at Houston.

Killer prions are impossible to stop. Prions are contributing to the death of millions of people now. Victims produce and spread prions daily because they’re in the bodily fluids of all victims. Millions of people with brain disease are contaminating their homes and communities, while exposing caregivers and family members to the contagion. The sewage from these victims is contaminating the local wastewater treatment plant and everything that enters or leaves these facilities, including reclaimed wastewater and sewage sludge. Once dumped on open land, these contagions remain infectious as they migrate, mutate and multiply forever.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Prions demand containment and isolation, not distribution and consumption through air, food and water. These toxins demand lined landfills not reckless dumping on our dinner tables. Since prions migrate, mutate and multiply, dilution is not a solution. Prions are a public health nightmare, not to mention the carnage taking place among other mammals.

The world has never done an effective job of managing its sewage. It’s an industry that drives by looking in the rear view mirror. It only swerves when the dead-end road is littered with body bags. After enough people get sick and die, new alternatives emerge. Today is no different.

We now have nearly eight billion people competing for food, water, open spaces and places to dump their sewage. As prion disease spreads and as industrial-scale agriculture becomes more intensive, sewage is becoming deadlier by the day. The stakes have never been higher.

The bodies are stacking up. The contamination grows stronger and spreads further every day. It’s time to stop dumping sewage sludge on land because of the prion risk and many others not accounted for in the antiquated and fraudulent risk assessments. It’s time for citizens to defend our land, water and air. Homelands around the world are under assault and ISIS has nothing to do with it. The terrorists are home-grown traitors. It’s treason.

Today, the land application of sewage sludge is killing mammals and more around the world. Pathogens in sludge are causing brain disease, cancer and death. Let’s take a meaningful stand for food safety. Just say no to sewage sludge in our watersheds and food supplies. Safer alternatives exist.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Take a free preview of our new eBook to learn everything that you need to know about the epidemic and the mismanagement. The rest of the book explains how to defend yourself with aversion and targeted nutrition. Eating organic foods is one way to minimize your exposure to sewage-borne toxins and pathogens. There are no silver bullets.

Please join our global coalition of Homeland Defenders. Join our campaign for truth and reform. Please write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Read More At http://crossbowcommunications.com/land-application-of-sewage-sludge-spreading-brain-disease/

Microcephaly Adds To Global Surge In Brain Disease

Microcephaly, Zika Virus Fueled By Sewage

Brain disease is consuming record numbers of people around the world right now. Microcephaly in infants is just the latest example.

Microcephaly is a nonspecific term used to describe a small head circumference, and can be caused by maternal exposure to a variety of pathogens and toxins, including HIV, alcohol, radiation, or TORCH pathogens (Toxoplasma gondii, other, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus). It is therefore important that radiologists know what to look for when it comes to Zika.

The global epidemic is being fueled by infectious waste that’s contaminating food, water, air and more. This infectious waste (from people with infectious brain disease) contains deadly and unstoppable neurotoxins, but it’s being spread like fertilizer in virtually every country around the world (if not just dumped openly). The fight against mosquitoes is part of the battle now, but it will miss the war against the source–infectious waste.

microcephaly and Zika virus

Zika virus is an emerging flavivirus initially described in 1947. The first outbreak of Zika virus occurred in 2007 in the Pacific and the virus has spread in this region since 2013, and in the Americas since 2015. Concomitantly, severe neurological complications in adults, fetuses, and neonates have been described. Zika virus is mainly mosquito borne, but non-vector transmission (maternal–fetal, sexual, and blood transfusion) is possible, with an unknown effect on the burden of the disease. Drinking contaminated water also is a growing source. So are foods infected with this contaminated water.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes are not the only pathway from infectious waste to you. Contaminated food, drinking water and the air that we breathe are just as dangerous.

raw sewage and water contamination

Microcephaly, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease and other neurodegenerative (brain) diseases are now spread by infectious medical wastes. 

To stop the global epidemic of brain disease, we must stop throwing fuel on the fire. Sewage mismanagement is contaminating food, water and air around the world. It’s spreading infectious waste and infectious diseases. Microcephaly is just the latest symptom of the global problem. Thanks to reckless policies, extreme weather now fans the flames. Tornadoes, floods, droughts and rising tides are pushing tons of sewage further into the lives of everyone. It’s a perfect storm.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

The planet has a record human population competing for limited space and resources. We are producing record volumes of sewage, which includes much more than the obvious. Sewage is now the most toxic, unregulated waste stream in the world. It’s become a deadly cocktail of carcinogens, radionuclides, nerve agents, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors and deadly prions—the deadly pathogen responsible for a spectrum of brain diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE).

The most common forms of TSE include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all forms of prion disease. TSEs also include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease and many others. It’s also killing sea mammals as oceans around the world continue filling with tons of sewage every day. There is no species barrier to prion disease or toxic exposure.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

The global surge in neurodegenerative disease among people, wildlife and livestock has been in motion for about 25 years thanks to the reckless dumping of sewage and the land application of sewage sludge as a fertilizer. The epidemic is reaching critical mass as neurodegenerative disease is now consuming the brains of the unborn–not just the aged.

microcephaly epidemic

Unfortunately, we are disposing of record quantities of sewage openly in the streets and rivers. We’re dumping tons of it on pastures, farms, parks, golf courses, sporting fields, forests and beyond. This infectious waste runs off into our water supplies. It’s picked up by the wind and carried to points unknown. Reckless practices, such as the land application of sewage sludge, have opened Pandora’s box. It’s causing irreversible, deadly contamination around the world.

Unfortunately, public servants are deliberately sweeping sewage-related risks under the rug. The risk assessments for the land application of sewage sludge, for example, are fraudulent. They were deliberately skewed to overlook proven public health risks, including airborne pathways. Bending the rules with bad science allowed for the creation of a multi-billion dollar industry and a toxic by-product called biosolids. It’s still deadly sewage sludge.

So-called regulators are overlooking deadly and unstoppable prions in sewage. As such, most sewage dumping and wastewater reclamation practices are illegal and should be stopped immediately. Safer alternatives exist.

sewage treatment and Zika virus

Thanks to this fraud, infectious sewage is being dumped openly in our watersheds and directly on crops. The prion pathogen in sewage, for example, migrates, mutates and multiplies. Prions shed from humans are the most aggressive and deadly. Prions demand more respect than radiation because they don’t deplete in the environment. Plus, each victim becomes a prion incubator and distributor. Prions should be locked away and contained. Not openly distributed and consumed by an unsuspecting public.

As warm weather approaches in the northern hemisphere, mosquitoes are awakening, breeding, biting and spreading sewage-borne diseases again. Reckless sewage dumping is creating a public health disaster. The dynamics associated with climate change are compounding the problems of sewage management. Mosquitoes have more fuel than ever. So does the wind and our water. It’s time to stop the mismanagement and misinformation. The stakes have never been higher.

infected water and disease

Please join our global coalition of Homeland Defenders. Join our campaign for truth and reform. Please write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Read More At http://crossbowcommunications.com/land-application-of-sewage-sludge-spreading-brain-disease/

Valley Fever Fueled By Sewage Sludge

Sewage Sludge Dumped On Land Driving Disease

High winds in dry places such as Arizona and California have become toxic events thanks to reckless sewage dumping. These powerful dust storms now carry lethal doses of pathogens in the form of particulates, which are swept away from farms, ranches, parks, gardens and golf courses. Thanks to reckless sewage treatment policies and practices, these poisonous particulates are now contributing to a spectrum of ailments, including the dreaded valley fever and even Alzheimer’s disease.

Valley Fever Phoenix Arizona

Prior to the 1990s, valley fever was a fairly rare disease. However, thanks to the U.S. EPA’s reckless science and policies, the desert began filling with sewage sludge around 1993. The sewage brought in a host of toxins, and pathogens, including radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, heavy metals, dioxins, fungus, bacteria, prions and other threats to public health. The nitrogen and carbon in the sewage sludge fuels a fungus in the sand and soil that causes valley fever. The sludge also provides a new medium to help transport the toxic mold spores far and wide.

Thanks to the U.S. EPA’s reckless policies on sewage treatment and sewage sludge (also known as the sludge rule in industry circles), toxins and pathogens that aren’t soaked up by plants, streams and rivers are now swept up by windstorms and dumped over large metropolitan areas, including Phoenix and Tucson. It’s in the soil. It’s on everything. Waves of sickness and death follow in each storm’s wake. Valley fever kills more than 100 people per year just in Maricopa County (Phoenix metropolitan area).

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Some estimate that there are about 150,000 cases of valley fever every year just in the U.S. Only forty percent of the people infected are symptomatic. Even fewer seek treatment because milder symptoms are difficult to distinguish from the flu. Therefore, the actual scope of the epidemic is merely a guess.

Two-thirds of all valley fever cases in the world are contracted in Arizona, where valley fever has been at epidemic levels since the state began keeping records in 1997. Today, there about 50,000 known new cases in Arizona each year. More than half of those cases are in Maricopa, Pinal and Pima counties.

“That area is the ‘Valley Fever Corridor,'” said Dr. John Galgiani, who directs the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

That’s a polite way of describing the danger zone. The desert regions of Arizona and California are buried in sewage dumped from places such as Phoenix, Tucson, Oceanside and Orange County, California. Thanks to these industrial-scale sewage dumps, dust storms carry much more than soil and sand. These microscopic sewage particulates are inhaled. Those that aren’t settle in homes, offices, gardens, streams, rivers, lakes, and beyond where they can do their damage at a later time. These particulates are so toxic that they are killing people, animals, landscaping and more as they settle in highly populated communities and rural ones alike.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

In 2008, the Arizona State Department of Health Services claimed valley fever as “Arizona’s Disease.” In 2012, valley fever was the second-most-reported disease in the state even though only about two percent of all cases are diagnosed and treated.

“If Arizona doesn’t do something, no one will,” said Rebecca Sunenshine, MD, Epidemiologist from the Centers for Disease Control.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describes valley fever as a “silent epidemic” because the number of cases has been increasing by about 15 percent per year. Even its conservative count has grown tenfold since 1998. It counted 2,265 cases in 1998 and more than 22,000 in 2011. Public awareness and aversion efforts have not gone up accordingly. The surge might be much larger because some states, including Texas, do not require public reporting of confirmed cocci cases. Valley fever is endemic in Texas along the Rio Grande River.

Valley Fever victimsvalley fever treatment

Symptoms of valley fever include fever, respiratory distress with coughing, chest pain and shortness of breath. Other common symptoms include muscle and joint aches, a skin rash, weight loss and lack of appetite and intense fatigue. A small subset of patients will suffer long-term health problems; in fewer still, cocci will disseminate from the lungs into other tissue—skin, bones, and, often fatally, the meninges of the brain. For those with cocci meningitis, the treatment can include a series of painful injections into the neck and spinal cord.

Though it sickens many times more people than West Nile virus, which affects much of the country, it has received only a small fraction of the funding for research.

“The impact of valley fever on its endemic populations is equal to the impact of polio or chicken pox before the vaccines,” said Galgiani. “But chicken pox and polio were worldwide threats.”

cocci symptoms

In July 2013, The New Yorker quoted a Bakersfield physician who described it as “a hundred different diseases,” depending on which toxin is inhaled and where the infection rests. Fortunately, cocci cannot spread from person to person, but other forms of sickness caused by sewage mismanagement are a different story.

The elderly and the immune-compromised—including pregnant women—are most susceptible; for unknown reasons, otherwise healthy African-Americans and Filipinos are disproportionately vulnerable to severe and life-threatening forms of the disease. (In one early study, Filipino men were estimated to be a hundred and seventy-five times as likely as white men to get sick from cocci, and a hundred and ninety-two times as likely to die from it.)

Official statistics do not include animals such as dogs, cats, horses and wild animals that have been stricken. Dogs are hit the hardest.

sewage sludge and Alzheimer's disease transmissible

The History Of Valley Fever

Valley Fever derives its name from its discovery in the San Joaquin Valley of California, where it was also referred to as “San Joaquin Valley Fever” or “Desert Rheumatism.” The medical name for Valley Fever is coccidioidomycosis (often shortened to “cocci” caused by the fungus coccidioides, which usually enters the lungs of victims.

Area of Distribution:

  • Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico.
  • San Joaquin and Central Valleys of California
  • Southern Arizona (especially in the Phoenix and Tucson areas).
  • Southern parts of Nevada, Utah, New Mexico and Western Texas (especially around El Paso)
  • Mexico (in the states of Sonora and Chihuahua).
  • Also found in semiarid and arid soils of Central and South America.

Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by coccidioides (kok-sid-e-OY-deze) organisms that enter your lungs. In soil, C. immitis exists in chains of barrel-shaped units called arthroconidia; airborne, these fragment easily into lightweight spores. C. immitis is adapted to lodge deep: its spores are small enough to reach the end of the bronchioles at the bottom of the lungs. We can breathe them in, but we can’t breathe them out.

Once in the lung, the spore circles up into a spherule, defined by a chitinous cell wall and filled with a hundred or so baby endospores. When the spherule is sufficiently full, it ruptures, releasing the endospores and stimulating an acute inflammatory response that disrupts blood flow to the tissue and can lead to necrosis. The endospores, each of which will become a new spherule, travel through the blood and lymph systems, allowing the cocci to spread anywhere the wind takes it. In people with weakened immune systems, cocci can overwhelm their bodies.

cocci symptoms
The first recorded victim of cocci had severe facial lesions similar to the ones on this victim.

The first recorded case of cocci involved a soldier in Argentina in 1891. Ulcerated, cauliflower-like nodes deformed his face. Doctors initially thought that he had an infectious form of cancer. Two years later, doctors in the San Joaquin Valley saw their first case in a field worker. He was blinded by lesions on his face and riddled with abscesses. Unfortunately, this case would not be the last.

“In the nineteen-fifties, both the U.S. and the Russians had bio-warfare programs using cocci,” said John Galgiani at the University of Arizona. “Generals can’t control agents that rely on air currents to disperse them, and it was difficult to use the vector precisely, so it fell out of favor. But terrorists don’t care about control—all they care about is perception. A single cell can cause disease, and you can genetically modify it to make it more powerful.”

Arizona also has one of the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S. Alzheimer’s disease is caused by a deadly form of protein called a prion. Prions also are in wastewater and unstoppable in wastewater treatment plants. When sewage particles are swept into the air, so are the highly contagious prions.

Parts of neighboring California, especially the San Joaquin Valley, also have produced a steady flow of valley fever victims since the early 1990s. Ironically, this is after rural America became an industrial-scale sewage dump thanks to the EPA’s controversial new sludge rule. The sludge rule opened the floodgates to sewage contamination in our watersheds and communities. Other nations have followed the same policies on wastewater treatment and sewage sludge disposal because of their trust in the U.S. government. The sludge rule has been crammed down the world’s throat along with tons of deadly sewage.

land application sewage sludge and disease

Land Application of Sewage Sludge Connected To Many Diseases

In addition to the fungi behind valley fever, windstorms can carry other pathogens from sewage and inject them into our daily lives. Wastewater treatment can’t stop prions or most other pathogens, which means that they thrive in wastewater treatment plants, sewage sludge, reclaimed water and effluent. Applying sewage to cocci growth sites is not a good idea. Cocci requires moisture, carbon and nitrogen, which sewage provides.

Other examples of recently emerging and reemerging soil-borne pathogens include clostridium, spp. bacteria, which cause a variety of diseases and are likely a permanent soil resident, transmitted by the fecal-oral route and through skin trauma; Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium, which causes listeriosis and is a permanent soil resident transmitted by contact with soil contaminated with infective feces and also by inhalation of the organism; Sin Nombre virus, a hantavirus, which causes hemorrhagic fever, is a transient soil resident, and is transmitted by inhalation of dust containing aerosolized rodent urine and feces; rotavirus spp., which causes diarrhea and enteritis, an incidental or less commonly, transient soil resident, transmitted by the fecal-soil-oral route also by the fecal-respiratory route; and, as stated above, prion disease, which includes Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease and many other neurological diseases (Essentials of Medical Geology: Revised Edition, page 501).

sewage treatment plant

Wastewater treatment technology also fails to keep radionuclides, carcinogens, pharmaceuticals and other poisons, including the coccidioides (cocci) fungi out of the sludge produced in the process. Plus, any fungus already on the desert floor gets supercharged with the fuel in sewage sludge. Thanks to sewage mismanagement, we’re injecting these pathogens directly into our lifecycle on an industrial scale. As such, valley fever, Alzheimer’s, autism and other maladies have become industrial diseases as pathways are expanding daily.

All sewage toxins are capable of going airborne once the sludge is dried and agitated into fine particles. Once airborne, the smallest of particles can travel thousands of miles. Unfortunately, the EPA failed to account for prions when it faked its science on the safety of biosolids. The EPA also failed to account for airborne pathways. Such oversights are reckless and incompetent at best. Given the damage that is stacking, and the lack of responsiveness from government and industry, modern sewage dumps are an aggressive form of bioterrorism.

Today, U.S. industry alone uses more than 60,000 chemicals. Most of them find their way into the sewer system and municipal sludge. These chemicals interact to form new chemicals, which can be even more toxic than the original form. These toxins and a deadly list of pathogens are all contaminating our food, water and air. Some are more deadly than others. Thanks to government collusion, many industries are making a killing.

Valley fever endemic zones

We may not know the full scope of valley fever because some physicians don’t think of testing for the infection in patients with common flu-like symptoms (fever and cough, fatigue, headache, rash, muscle aches and joint pain). A 2010 survey by the New Mexico public health department revealed that 69 percent of clinicians responding did not consider valley fever in patients with respiratory problems. If you live in or visit an area where the fungus is found and develop persistent flu-like symptoms, ask your physician to test for cocci.

A study by the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona shows that two-thirds of patients with valley fever in Arizona were misdiagnosed. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control in 2006, one in three Arizona patients diagnosed with pneumonia and treated with antibiotics may be misdiagnosed and treated with the wrong drugs. The federal report said the patients may have had a valley fever, a fungal pneumonia, although most of the patients were managed as if they had a bacterial infection with antibiotics. Valley Fever is caused by a fungus and would not be treated by drugs directed at bacteria, according to the Arizona center’s study.

Alzheimer's CJD and sewage

Valley Fever Outbreaks In California

California’s San Joaquin Valley is another hot spot for valley fever. Kern County and the Bakersfield area are ground zero for the disease. Kern County also is where Los Angeles dumps the majority of its sewage. The highest rate of infection is in Antelope Valley, a rapidly developing outpost of the county that adjoins the southern edge of the San Joaquin Valley. In the past decade, the number of cases there has increased 545 percent.

The community of Antelope Valley has seen its population double in thirty years. It has been transformed from a sleepy agricultural zone to a dense residential area. Fields that once grew alfalfa now grow residential developments. New families have moved into the neighborhood. Many are vulnerable to the threat of valley fever.

As it turns out, the San Joaquin Valley is a hot spot for clusters of the valley fever. According to the CDC, during 1991, reported cases of Coccidioidomycosis (i.e., valley fever) in California increased more than three-fold over the annual number of cases reported since 1986; during 1992, the number of reported cases increased 10-fold.

In 1991, 1208 new cases of coccidioidomycosis were reported to the California Department of Health Services (CDHS), compared with an average of 450 cases per year
during the previous 5 years. Of these cases, 959 (80%) were reported from Kern
County, where coccidioidomycosis is known to be endemic and where the county
health department serves as a referral laboratory for coccidioidomycosis serologic
tests. Kern County also is where California once dumped much of its sewage sludge.

biosolids spread disease

In the years leading up to the 2006, one third of California’s sewage sludge was applied to land in Kern County. Orange County, Los Angeles County, Oxnard and Ventura all sent their sludge to Kern County. On June 6, 2006, the Kern County ballot initiative to ban sludge application passed with 85 percent of the vote.

Of all cases reported to CDHS in 1991, 765 (63%) were reported from October
through December. In 1992, 4541 cases of coccidioidomycosis were reported to CDHS
(Figure 1). Of these, 4198 (92%) were reported from the central valley and southern
California, including 3027 (67%) from Kern County. Reports from the occidioidomycosis
Serology Laboratory of the University of California at Davis, a reference laboratory that receives specimens from areas of California other than Kern County, also documented an increased incidence in 1991 and 1992.

Antje Lauer, an environmental microbiologist who teaches at the university in Bakersfield, has been tracking the issues for years. In an article in The New Yorker by Dana Goodyear, she explained that the arthroconidia fungus is notoriously hard to find in the ground. A spot that tests positive once may subsequently come up negative; a positive site can be separated from a negative one by a matter of yards. Little is known about where the fungus thrives and why. Several years ago, Lauer began trying to discern some pattern to its presence. Initially, she said,

“I just drove around Bakersfield and used my intuition. I sampled here, I sampled there.” On Coles Levee Road, a desolate strip owned by Los Angeles County, which uses part of it as a sewage dump, she found the fungus nearly every time she looked, she explained to the reporter.

Another California outbreak happened in 1994 in Ventura County following an earthquake that struck the region. During the two months after the earthquake, 170 people were diagnosed with acute coccidioidomycosis because of the airborne dust. During all of 1993, there were only 52 cases reported in the county.

Green Valley, Arizona resident Ron Brill said he began experiencing Valley Fever symptoms in 2006 when he and his wife were cruising Europe.

“I started getting pains in an area at the top of my lungs which I was certain couldn’t be a heart attack,” Brill recalled. “I eventually was hospitalized in Austria where they have no idea about Valley Fever. There I started having severe chills and uncontrollable shaking. My daughter had to get me to the emergency room in Boston, and still they had no idea what it was.”

Brill returned home where he was eventually diagnosed with Valley Fever, but his visual diagnosis until he was tested for the illness was pneumonia.

“I had most of the major risk factors for Valley Fever, but went through weeks of feeling ill before that was diagnosed,” he said. “Had I known what to look for as far as the risk factors are concerned, I would have asked much earlier to be tested for Valley Fever.”

Thanks to the EPA’s infamous sludge rule of 1993, Americans are choking on sewage. Parts of Arizona and California are feeling the brunt of the epidemic. Arizona not only dumps its own sewage sludge on crops, parks, golf courses and gardens, it imports tons of it from California, too.

The sewage is dumped on crops throughout rural regions and open spaces in metropolitan areas, including city golf courses in the Phoenix metropolitan area. I can personally attest that sewage sludge from the Encina Wastewater Authority in Carlsbad, California is being trucked across state lines, where it is dumped within 50 feet of private residences–without consent and without notice. The golf course workers sprayed the crap into my backyard as collateral damage. The toxic crap is being peddled under the name “Pure Green.”

The dose put on the Ken McDonald Golf Course in May 2015 killed massive sections of the fairways for months. It killed landscaping in my backyard that borders the 17th hole. Who knows what damage was done to local residents, pets and wildlife. It’s dumped without consent and without notice. It’s bioterrorism. These “dirty bombs” are being dropped around us every day.

If you live in or visit areas where valley fever is common, take commonsense precautions, especially during the dry, dusty summer months when the chance of infection is highest. Consider wearing a mask, staying inside during dust storms, wetting the soil before digging, and keeping doors and windows tightly closed. Contact us and join our campaign for reform.

Please join us in our quest for truth and reform of reckless sewage dumping practices around the world. For more information, please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com

Alzheimer’s Disease Epidemic Fueled By Sewage Contamination

Biosolids, Wastewater Reuse Spreading Neurological Disease

People are dying of neurological disease at an accelerating rate, while death rates from most major diseases are dropping. Why the divergence?

Unfortunately, a pathogen associated with neurological disease is spreading uncontrollably. Research suggests that food and water supplies around the world have been contaminated with an unstoppable form of protein known as a prion (PREE-on). Ignorance, negligence, fraud and corruption are fanning the flames today. We’re facing an environmental nightmare.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

According to health officials, the epidemic will spread exponentially. The prion epidemic includes Alzheimer’s disease, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease (deer) and many others. There is no species barrier. Some people die within weeks of symptoms, while others take years. There is no cure.

At least 50 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Millions of other cases are undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Doctors have suppressed millions of other diagnoses. It’s an outrage. The epidemic is worse than the public knows.

Two groups of investigators at Rush University in Chicago independently analyzed the epidemic in a double-blind study. Both groups determined that Alzheimer’s-related mortality rates were several times higher than reflected by official figures.

With weak data in mind, the official death toll from Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S. alone still increased 68 percent between 2000 and 2010. Millions of additional cases went undiagnosed, misdiagnosed and misreported. The epidemic is expanding exponentially thanks to misinformation, fraud, acts of gross negligence and what appears to be deliberate attempts to put corporate profits over public health.

Pandora-like prions are out of the box and contaminating homes, communities and entire watersheds—including our food and water supplies. It’s time for government and industry to lead, follow or get out of the way of the truth and solutions.

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” The spectrum of TSEs includes Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, mad cow and chronic wasting disease in deer. It appears that autism is part of the same spectrum. Few, if any, mammals are immune.

TSEs are unstoppable and incurable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions have been detected in the blood, urine, mucas, feces, milk, saliva and aerosols from victims of the disease. Blood alone assures that every ounce of the victim is contaminated. As organs and tissue become infected, the body sheds more and more prions into the environment every day.

Prions also are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans and in the brain damage of athletes like football players who have suffered repeated concussions. It appears that head trauma can trigger healthy prions to begin converting into deadly ones.

Victims of prion disease are infectious long before they appear sick. These carriers are donating blood, eating at your favorite restaurant, going to your dentist and loading public sewer systems with every flush. Unfortunately, much of the sewage is dumped where it contaminates your food and your water.

biosolids land application

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering, naming and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the rising importance of his research. Unfortunately, U.S. policy on many fronts ignores the perils of prions. Most countries are guilty of the same offense.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it included a provision to halt research on prions in all but two laboratories. It classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and more. It was a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, industry pressure convinced the Center For Disease Control to quietly take prions off the list of special agents two years ago. Keeping prions listed threatened to outlaw several multi-billion dollar industries. The reversal kept the floodgates open to the prion threat. Especially regarding sewage treatment and land application, agriculture and water reclamation industries.

The problem with prions is that they linger in the environment infinitely because they defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Unlike viruses or bacteria, prions are not alive. Therefore, they can’t be killed. Victims contaminate cups, dishes, utensils, air and much more with just their saliva, mucas, cough or sneeze. Items exposed are hopelessly contaminated. Victims visit doctors and dentists every day. Some have surgery.

Alzheimer's disease research

Unfortunately, surgical and dental instruments used on these victims are hopelessly contaminated. People have contracted prion disease from contaminated surgical instruments. Hospitals have been successfully sued because of the proven exposure. Now, medical instruments are thrown away after being used on patients with known prion disease.

If it’s impossible to stop prions in an operating room, it’s impossible to stop them in the challenging environment of a wastewater treatment system.

Prions spread uncontrollably and contaminate everything that they touch—much like radiation. Unlike radiation, however, prions do not deplete themselves. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals and is reported to be up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals.

Prion diseases are killing humans, wildlife and livestock around the world today. It’s been gaining momentum over the past century. So has mismanagement by government, some researchers and industry.

infectious waste and food contamination

The prion problem is getting worse with rising populations, rising concentrations of people, intensive agriculture, reckless sewage disposal policies and other mismanaged pathways. As the epidemic strikes more people, the pathways for prion exposure explode and intensify. Reckless sewage disposal policies and practices alone are putting billions of innocent people in the crossfire right now. Entire watersheds are endangered thanks to a deadly pathogen that migrates, mutates and multiplies.

“The brain diseases caused by prions includes Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), and other disorders known as frontotemporal dementias,” said Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner.

The TSE epidemic represents an environmental nightmare that threatens every mammal on Earth. Related diseases are killing wildlife and livestock around the world. Marine mammals also are vulnerable.

Prion disease is a spectrum disease. Some prions can kill people within weeks of exhibiting clinical symptoms, while others take years. Other people may not fall victim to the disease, but they can carry the pathogen internally and externally after exposure. Pathway management and pathway aversion are critical if we hope to save mammals on land and at sea.

caregivers Alzheimer's disease

Doctors Mismanaging Diagnoses

Since prion disease is a spectrum disease, doctors can’t tell the difference between them. The only definitive diagnosis of a prion disease comes with an autopsy. Autopsies, however, are rarely conducted because of concerns over deadly contamination. A corpse with prion infection will contaminate all tools used by coroners and morticians. Meanwhile, fluids and liquefied organs from these bodies are dumped into the sewage system—destined for your wastewater treatment plant and then some poor farmer’s cornfield and dairy farm.

All doctors are guessing with each Alzheimer’s, CJD or Parkinson’s diagnosis based on the severity of the symptoms. Doctors are withholding millions of additional diagnoses from patients and their families. Regardless of the motive, this censorship puts an unbearable load on families both emotionally and financially. It also puts caregivers in harm’s way, while insulating healthcare companies from expensive patient treatment and care. If healthcare companies tackle the full brunt of the Alzheimer’s epidemic, it will bankrupt them within the next five years. They will continue outrunning claims as long as possible.

Since doctors are essentially guessing on each victim, Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong at least 20 percent of the time. Those cases typically are further up the prion-disease spectrum under the term Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). CJD is a more severe and extremely contagious mutation of prion disease.

Unfortunately for caregivers and family members, the protocol for patient care and caregiver safety is vastly different for Alzheimer’s patients versus CJD patients. This mismanagement puts many stakeholders at risk.

It’s reckless to try to distinguish between prion diseases on the spectrum. The medical community should treat people with Alzheimer’s disease as though they have CJD—as though they are highly contagious. Family members and other caregivers should be warned accordingly. Caregivers of those with dementia are six times more likely to contract prion disease than someone who is not a caregiver.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

Pissing In The Pool

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged, including sewage, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater. As stated earlier, blood, saliva, mucus, urine, feces, milk and cell tissue all carry infectious prions. These human discharges are flushed down toilets and sinks billions of times every day. We all have flushed away toxic or infectious waste that we would never throw on our garden or in our water well. The magic wand at the sewage treatment plant doesn’t phase most of these elements. It obviously doesn’t phase flesh-eating bacteria, either.

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions in municipal waste streams. Despite this important technical detail, we’re dumping tons of infectious sewage on crops, gardens, pastures, golf courses, playgrounds and open spaces in our forests every day. Wind, rain and other natural dynamics put the sewage right back into our air, food and water supplies.

Spreading sewage sludgebiosolids, and reclaimed wastewater anywhere is a risk. Dumping them directly into our food and water is reckless, incompetent and criminal. We’re dumping prions into our lifecycle by the trainloads daily. Every nation is guilty.

land application sewage sludge and disease

To be precise, people with Alzheimer’s or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have used every sewage system in the world for years, which means that these systems all are hopelessly contaminated with prions. The problem intensifies with the addition of new prions and the exponential growth of existing ones in the sewage treatment system. The sewage from hospitals, nursing homes, slaughterhouses, morgues, mortuaries and other high-risk places enters the same sewage treatment system.

The condensed sludge from all of these places is then dumped on our farms and ranches by the truckload. Plastic packaging and other large items are often visible in this waste, which means that treatment is extremely minimal. If the Pope waved his hand over the sewage, it would likely receive better treatment than what we see today. Nothing stops a prion, but you would hope that billions of dollars of wastewater treatment technology would at least take out pill bottles, syringes, needles and used prophylactics.

Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, sewage systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Wastewater treatment plants are now prion incubators and distributors. Sewage sludge, wastewater reuse, biosolids and other sewage byproducts are biohazards causing bioterror. Thanks to questionable policymakers and profiteers, you are eating and drinking from your neighbor’s toilet–and the toilets at the local nursing home and hospital. We might as well dump sewage out of windows again.

wastewater treatment plant

Pandora’s Lunchbox

Thanks to more and more sewage mismanagement, we’re dumping more deadly prions on farms and ranches than ever. The wastewater industry and their consultants have convinced agricultural operations around the world that sewage and biosolids are safe, effective and profitable for all involved.

As it turns out, today’s sewage isn’t safe. Sewage sludge isn’t an effective fertilizer. The business is profitable, though—until the sickness and disease sets in for the farmers, workers and the consumers. Until the land is condemned for being hopelessly contaminated—making everyone downstream sick.

Exposing crops and livestock to prions is a very bad idea. Plants absorb prions from the treated soil along with ordinary water uptake, which makes the prions bioavailable and infectious to humans, wildlife and livestock in yet another way. We might as well inject deadly prions into our veins.

In addition to uptake from the soil and water, plants also are contaminated through contact with biosolids. Rain can splash the death dust up on stalks and leaves, which contaminates them from the outside. People, livestock and wildlife are exposed to neurological disease just by consuming food grown in sewage sludge. The more consumed, the greater the risk. Utensils used in the harvesting, processing, cooking and eating of these crops also are permanently contaminated.

biosolids and food safety

Meat and milk from livestock raised on pastures treated with sewage sludge are at risk of carrying prions. Livestock that graze on these dumping grounds can pull prions up directly from the soil as part of their daily grazing. Grains and grass grown in sewage sludge and then fed to livestock is a risk and a possible prion pathway. Such exposure can turn these animals into incubators and distributors of prions.

People and predators that consume infected animals are at risk. Prions appear to mutate and become more deadly as they move up the food chain through consumption. Prions from people are the most deadly and the most difficult to stop.

Prions are not the only ingredient in sewage that threatens food and water safety. Heavy metals, endocrine disruptors, carcinogens, flesh-eating bacteria, radioactive waste, Zika virus and other deadly cocktails await dispersal to innocent bystanders.

Once sewage is dumped on crops and grazing land, the damage isn’t done. Rain, irrigation and wind proceed to spread the prions and other contaminants throughout our communities, watersheds and into our oceans. Dumping tons of sewage from millions of people on farms and ranches spreads the prion pathogen far and wide. It’s a vicious case of Pandora’s lunchbox. We can avoid some of the prion risk by eating foods that are organic. Fruits and vegetables grown in sewage sludge cannot be legally labeled as certified organic.

Profits, Prions and Peons

Thanks to prions, sewage management has become more of a nightmare than ever. Getting it out of our food and water will not be easy. Europe alone spends more than 2.2 billion euros every year to get sewage sludge out of the cities. Unfortunately, about 60 percent of the crap is dumped on agriculture and landscaping around homes and offices. Disposing of it safely would cost billions more.

Finland and Sweden are top offenders in Europe regarding sewage dumped inappropriately. People there live and play near the Baltic Sea, which is one of the most polluted bodies of water on the planet. Sewage mismanagement generates most of that pollution. Sewage is polluting their food and water supplies. As a result, Finland has the highest rate of Alzheimer’s deaths in the world. Sweden is third. Norway just became the first nation in Europe to detect chronic wasting disease in wildlife. The entire Baltic region is a sewage nightmare.

The United States has the fourth-highest death rate from Alzheimer’s in the world. Washington State is off the charts. Like Finland, it has a long history of sewage mismanagement. It dumps sewage on crops, near rivers and upstream in forests. It drains back into the rivers, streams. lakes, coves and bays where so many people live, play, eat and drink.

Public servants are making questionable decisions regarding public health on many levels. Innocent people and animals are paying the price.Wisconsin is another interesting case history. Almost every county in Wisconsin has helped get rid of sewage sludge and biosolids. Now, the state’s deer herd is being decimated by prion disease. The epidemic is being mismanaged on many levels. Prion-laced sewage and sick deer pose a serious threat to Wisconsin’s multi-billion dollar dairy herd. Of course, people are exposed, too.

California produces a significant amount of the U.S. food supply. Los Angeles, for example, ships a huge amount of its sewage sludge where crops abound. Arizona also is a favorite dumping ground for California’s largest cities. Cropland near Yuma is a favorite target. Open space in the Phoenix metro area also has been targeted with California’s latest export.

Valley Fever caused by land application of sewage sludge

 

Thanks to sewage from California, Arizona also has one of the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S. Windstorms in the desert carry much more than sand and dust. Sewage sludge particles are part of every dust cloud that sweeps over Phoenix, Tucson and beyond. Then homeowners and their landscapers take turns blowing it back and forth across the street with dust blowers. As a result, the region is plagued by a mystery respiratory illness called valley fever. It’s wicked. The virus never leaves your body.

These are just a few examples of sewage mismanagement and the human threat. It’s happening somewhere near you. Sewage mismanagement in agriculture is a direct assault on the landowners, investors, workers, livestock, neighbors downstream and downwind and consumers. Crops, poultry, dairy, meat and water all are vulnerable to the prion threat.

Despite the unstoppable risk that sewage and prions represent to agriculture, testing for mad cow disease is very weak in most countries. In fact, the USDA reduced BSE testing in 2003 after finding the third mad cow. Out of about 35 million animals slaughtered annually, only 35,000 are tested for the deadly disease. Despite reduced testing, 22 cases have been confirmed in the U.S., so far. Another 20 cases have been confirmed in Canada. Japan, by contrast, tests every cow killed for consumption. Mad cow disease is not an isolated event. It’s impossible to contain. It’s just the tip of an iceberg.

mad cow disease

The prion risk in dairy cattle is another issue. Most, if not all cases of mad cow disease in the U.S. and other countries have been dairy cattle, so such research seems logical. Beef cattle rarely live long enough to exhibit symptoms of mad cow disease. Dairy cattle often live much longer, which increases their exposure to prions and it gives them more time to become visibly sick. It also gives them more time and opportunity to contribute milk to the food supply.

Prions have been found in the milk of mammals, but no one has been allowed to test for prions in the milk of cattle. Given the enormous influence of the dairy industry, research on dairy milk, cheese and prions will probably never happen. Prion behavior observed in other species, however, confirms the risk.

At the beginning of 1985, the world had never heard of mad cow disease. Public concern quickly gained momentum once the epidemic was exposed. At first, the U.K. government and industry insiders tried to cover up the threat. Politicians and regulators were more than willing to cast fate to the wind regarding public health.

The U.K. killed almost 200,000 cattle in an attempt to eradicate the disease. Thousands of carcasses were burned and others were buried in pits. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to eradicate prion disease because of the perpetual environmental pathways. Cases continue to arise, but testing has been rendered ineffective at best. Ireland just confirmed a new case of the disease in June 2015. Ireland was ground zero during the first mad cow crisis 30 years ago.

In the past, most infected cattle got the disease from eating feed made from the ground up blood, fat and bones of dead cattle. Once they fed a mad cow back to these vegetarian herds, the contagion spread like wildfire. Diet is a proven source of exposure to prion disease. Food and water contaminated by sewage may have contributed to that initial outbreak in 1985.

Unfortunately, no one knows exactly how many infected cattle were slaughtered and consumed by innocent families. That’s one of the weaknesses of the global food production systems. That’s one of the reasons that it’s vital to keep prions out of agriculture.

Scientific Research Ignored

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found human prions in urine.

Dr. Claudio Soto prion research
Dr. Claudio Soto is one of the leading prion researchers in the world.

Soto also confirmed that plants uptake prions and are infectious and deadly to those who consume such plants. Therefore, humans, wildlife and livestock are vulnerable to prion disease via plants grown on land treated with sewage sludge and reclaimed sewage water.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Pedersen’s research also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage and its byproducts are dumped.

joel pedersen prion research
Dr. Joel Pedersen has confirmed the risks associated with prions in sewage sludge and soil.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Over the past 30 years, there has been a great deal of research to better understand the fate of toxins and pathogens in biosolids when applied to crops and grazing land. Much of that research is taking place today in an open laboratory, on innocent citizens in thousands of communities around the world. Unfortunately, they aren’t willing participants.

The Sludge Rule

In the United States, the EPA began regulating sewage sludge under the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act to prevent biosolids from contaminating waterways. In 1977, Congress asked EPA to:

  • ­ Identify alternatives for biosolids use and disposal;
  • ­ Specify what factors must be accounted for in determining the methods and practices applicable to each of these identified uses; and
  • ­Identify concentrations of pollutants that would interfere with each use.

In 1978, the EPA limited concentrations of cadmium, PCBs and pathogens. In 1987, Congress told EPA to identify possible toxins in biosolids, including limits necessary to protect public health and environment. Congress asked the EPA to develop regulations for biosolids.

EPA science for sale

The Standards for the Use and Disposal of Sewage Sludge, Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 503 was promulgated in 1993. It’s known as the sludge rule. It’s the environmental equivalent of Catch-22.

The sludge rule gives EPA the right to push sludge-control authority to each state, with minimal guidance. Thanks to the pro-industry sludge rule, sewage sludge is mismanaged in every state, while contributing to water contamination and other reckless public health exposures across the nation. Instead of helping the nation speak with one voice and the voice of reason, EPA created a new episode of Keystone Cops.

Americans have been told to eat shit and die. Literally. So have most people in the world.

According to the U.S. EPA, “Prions are extremely resistant to inactivation by ultraviolet light, irradiation, boiling, dry heat, formaline, freezing, drying and changes in pH. Methods for inactivating prions in infected tissues or wastes include incineration at very high temperatures and alkaline hydrolysis.” They didn’t mention hydrogen peroxide, which is how some toilet-to-tap programs hope to kill deadly prions. 

The EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure. The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its questionable risk assessments regarding biosolids. The EPA reserves the right to adjust these risk assessments, however, as the test of time disproves its pseudo-science.

Even the EPA’s own internal audit found that the agency is dropping the ball on sewage regulation and management. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Inspector General (OIG) sewage regulations are weak, outdated and not enforced. In September 2014, the OIG offered the following summary of its findings:

“Management controls put in place by the EPA to regulate and control hazardous chemical discharges from sewage treatment plants to water resources have limited effectiveness. The EPA regulates hazardous chemical discharges to and from sewage treatment plants, but these regulations are not effective in controlling the discharge of hundreds of hazardous chemicals to surface waters such as lakes and streams.

Sewage treatment plant staff do not monitor for hazardous chemicals discharged by industrial users. This is due to a general regulatory focus on the priority pollutants list that has not been updated since 1981, limited monitoring requirements, limited coordination between EPA offices, a lack of tracking hazardous waste notifications required for submittal by industrial users, or a lack of knowledge of discharges reported by industrial users under the Toxics Release Inventory. Except for EPA Region 9, sewage treatment plant permits generally include very few monitoring requirements or effluent limits, which can limit enforcement actions. The EPA developed whole effluent toxicity test results as a mechanism to identify toxic chemicals such as hazardous discharges to sewage treatment plants. However, these are not required for all permits, and are not tracked by the EPA to verify that sewage treatment plants are reporting results as required. Moreover, exceedances of chemical limits in permits and toxicity tests do not trigger notification to enforcement programs. Consequently, the EPA may not be aware of chemical discharge or toxicity exceedances that should be addressed to minimize potentially harmful contamination of water resources.”

Today, Americans generate about 182 gallons of wastewater per person per day. Approximately 7.1 million tons of sewage sludge are generated each year from the treatment process at the more than 16,000 municipal wastewater treatment facilities across the country. Thanks to the EPA’s infamous sludge rule, approximately 55 percent of the sludge is dumped on land as fertilizer and soil amendment. The U.S. might soon become the world’s leader in neurological disease with this type of misguided leadership.

livestock killed by sewage

Fortunately, citizens are rising up to defend themselves. The Town Board in Wheatfield, New York, for example unanimously voted in July 2014 to ban any application of sewage sludge and other similar materials from the treatment of municipal wastewater to any land in town. The law reasons that the potential contamination of groundwater, surface water, and soil, as well as the potential for air pollution, poses an unreasonable risk to town residents, public health, and the environment.

Residents of the Nicola Valley in British Columbia are protesting the dumping of sewage sludge on their lands now. The five First Nations chiefs of the Nicola Valley took their fight against biosolids to the B.C. legislature. The group is calling on the government to stop importing sewage sludge from the Lower Mainland and the Okanagan and dumping them on their ancestral lands.

food and water contamination cause neurological disease

 

“When it comes to biosolids, the government ignores and the government completely disregards, our rights protected by the constitution,” said Chief Aaron Sam. 

Nicola Valley residents have maintained a blockade to prevent trucks from transporting more sewage sludge in and dumping it on their land. The facts are on their side. Independent testing shows biosolids do contaminate Nicola Valley lands and waters. The testing facilitated by the David Suzuki Foundation shows that samples of biosolids taken from the Nicola Valley contained alarmingly high amounts of dangerous toxins, including Copper, Mercury, Tin and Zinc.

“The independent tests confirm that biosolids must not be applied to land,” said Sam. “Biosolids contaminate our lands and waters, and it has serious potential negative effects on fish, animals and plants, First Nations people are reliant on the land for food and medicines.  Biosolids put the health of our community members at risk. We can no longer sit back while the Government of British Columbia ignores our constitutionally protected rights to our title and rights.”

In 2009, the U.S. EPA released the results from its Targeting National Sewage Sludge Survey (TNSSS), which measures chemical concentrations in land-based biosolid application areas. The results are striking. Out of 84 samples:

  • 27 metals are found in virtually every sample with antimony found in no less than 72 samples;
  • Of six semi-volatile organics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), four are found in 72 samples, one is found in 63 samples and one found in 39 samples;
  • Of 72 pharmaceuticals, three (i.e. ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, and triclocarban) are found in all 84 samples, nine are found in at least 80 samples;
  • Of 25 steroids and hormones, three steroids are found in 84 samples and six are found in 80 samples; and,
  • All flame retardants, except one, are found in nearly every sample.

Over the past 30 years, a significant body of research has been compiled on the organic chemical contaminants in land applied biosolids that support these findings. While the focus has ranged from persistent organic pollutants, such as chlorinated dioxins/ furans, to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, heavy metals, PCBs, and pharmaceutical contaminants, only dioxins have been assessed by EPA. While they took no action based on the assessment, they determined that risks were below the levels of action.

Many of the crops grown in biosolids have higher concentrations of heavy metals. The regulatory pitfalls are outlined by the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). This group reports that there are major data gaps in the science underlying current rules, as well as a lack of epidemiologic studies on exposed populations, and inadequate programs to ensure compliance with biosolid regulations.

Under the Clean Water Act, the EPA is required to review existing biosolid regulations every two years in order to identify pollutants that need to be regulated. However, EPA has only researched a fraction of the chemicals that are known to exist in sludge and, of those researched, only some have risk assessments. NRC concludes that EPA’s biosolids risk-assessment and regulatory process is cumbersome and slow, with large information gaps on complex pathogenic interactions, and ignoring important secondary transmission pathways.

For now, organic certification is the last safe haven from biosolids for consumers. Farms that are USDA organic certified are prohibited from applying biosolids under the National Organic Standards Rule.

When the proposed Rule first came out in 1997, EPA feared that it would deter new users from using biosolids as a fertilizer and pressed the USDA to exempt biosolids from the ruling. In 1998, USDA released proposed organic standards that would allow bioengineered crops, irradiation, and sewage sludge in organic production. USDA reconsidered and prohibited the controversial elements in the final rule.

We know that biosolids have a complex array of biological pathogens, chemical contaminants, pharmaceuticals, hormones/steroids, and emerging contaminants that are not completely eliminated by waste water treatment plants. The land application of biosolids should be abandoned immediately, since the current regulatory restrictions and biosolids treatment programs allow for ongoing contamination of the environment, which threatens human health.

Read the full story about the Alzheimer’s disease epidemic at http://crossbowcommunications.com/sewage-mismanagement-killing-millions-of-people-annually/

Alzheimer’s Disease Surging Across Scandinavia

Sewage Sludge Contaminating Food, Water

Alzheimer’s disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. People living across Scandinavia have some of the highest prevalence of the disease in the world.

At least 50 million people already have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. It’s vastly undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, doctors are withholding millions of additional diagnoses in the United States, so we don’t know the extent of the epidemic in America, but the incidence likely rivals Finland.

Alzheimer's disease and caregivers

According to recent studies, Finland has the highest incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the world. Iceland and Sweden aren’t far behind. It could be that Finland is doing a better job of screening, diagnosing and offering honest assessments.

What can we learn from these regional variations? What are the common threads that can help us unravel the causes of neurological disease?

Alzheimer’s/Dementia Deaths/100K

1.   Finland                     34.9
2.  Iceland                      25.1
3.  United States           24.8
4.  Sweden                     21.5
5.  Netherlands             21.4
6.  Switzerland              20.0
7.  Cuba                           19.6
8.  Chile                          19.6
9.  Andorra                     19.4
10.  Spain                        18.7
11.  Norway                     18.6
12.  Uruguay                   17.5
13.  Denmark                  17.4
14.  United Kingdom    17.1
15.  France                      16.6

Although there are many causes of Alzheimer’s disease and related neurological diseases, the Baltic Sea region is a microcosm worth studying. The Baltic Sea is one of the most polluted bodies of water on the planet. Much of the pollution originates upstream and on land, but tons of it are dumped directly in the sea.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

It’s infectious waste. Raw sewage and sewage sludge. Waste from morgues, hospitals, nursing homes, slaughter houses, veterinarians and the homes of millions of people who have brain disease and other infectious diseases. This infectious waste is being dumped on open land as fertilizer. It’s contaminating food, water, air and more in most countries.

The Problem With Prions

In order to understand the threat, one must understand the dynamics of this neurological disease. Alzheimer’s disease, for example, is a member of an aggressive family (spectrum) of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE)The operative word is “transmissible.”

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in deer. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure. There is no species barrier. 

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). Prion disease is unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims, including skin.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Prions linger in the environment infinitely because they defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. They spread uncontrollably within victims and within the environment. They know no borders. Unlike radiation, however, prions do not deplete themselves. Unlike cancer, there is no cure. Prions migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the unstoppable pathogen.

“The (human) brain diseases caused by prions include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), and other disorders known as frontotemporal dementias,” said Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner, who earned a Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1997 for discovering deadly prions.

prion disease spectrum

Prion disease is a spectrum disease because of its many mutations and genetic resistance. Some prions can kill people within weeks of exhibiting clinical symptoms, while others can take years. Others may not fall victim to the disease, but can still carry the pathogen internally and externally. Victims become infectious long before they appear sick. Their bodily fluids proceed to contaminate the world around them.

Since prion disease is a spectrum disease, doctors can’t tell the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and CJD. It’s a process of elimination and a shot in the dark.

“Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

According to neuroscientists Dr. Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

The only definitive diagnosis comes with an autopsy, which rarely happens with neurological disease (concerns over deadly contamination). All doctors are guessing with each diagnosis based on the severity of the symptoms. This problem also complicates the search for accurate statistics about the size and scope of the epidemic.

Unfortunately for caregivers and family members, the protocol for patient care and caregiver safety are vastly different for Alzheimer’s patients and CJD patients. The double standards put many stakeholders at risk. It’s reckless to try to distinguish between prion diseases on the spectrum. In other words, treat people with Alzheimer’s disease as though they have CJD. Assume the worst and hope for the best. A deadly prion is a deadly prion.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

The Sewage Tsunami

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged. Thanks to sewage, biosolids, and reclaimed sewage water, we’re recycling the prion pathogen that causes Alzheimer’s and CJD right back into our food and water. Every sewage system in the world has been used by someone, if not millions, of people with Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Sewage systems are now prion incubators and distributors. Sewage sludge, wastewater, biosolids and other byproducts are highly lethal.

Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, and thanks to more and more sewage mismanagement, we’re dumping deadly pathogens on farms, parks, golf courses and school grounds. Rain and irrigation spread the prions throughout our communities, watersheds and into our oceans. Winds carries prion-laced dust into our communities, schools, offices and homes.

Dumping tons of sewage from millions of people on land and at sea spreads the prion pathogen far and wide. It’s a case of Pandora’s lunchbox. We’re contaminating our food and water supplies with our own sewage.

Alzheimer's disease Finland Sweden Iceland
Sewage and other contaminants dumped in the Baltic Sea are essentially trapped, where they continue to contribute to prion contamination.

Now, back to our Baltic story. The Baltic Sea is positioned in Northern Europe and bordered by Sweden, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, northeastern Germany, and eastern Denmark and its numerous islands. It’s the source of food for millions of people. Its watersheds provide drinking water for hundreds of communities, not to mention livestock, throughout the region. Unfortunately, pollution is killing the Baltic Sea and residents of the region.

“This is one of the world’s most polluted oceans,” said Fredrik Wulff, a professor of marine systems ecology at Stockholm University. “Because it’s an almost closed body of water, everything that’s dumped here stays for decades.”

Baltic Sea pollution

The untreated waste from the Russian city of Kaliningrad is part of the problem. Kaliningrad dumps about 150,000 cubic meters of raw sewage from 450,000 people into the sea every day. Most other coastal cities throughout the region dump even higher quantities of sewage, although it’s treated slightly. These treated wastewater facilities might help reduce solids and nitrogen, but nothing stops a prion in sewage.

“Kaliningrad is a medieval city that pours its waste into the gutter,” said Aleksandra Korolyova, a Kaliningrad-based activist with the Russian group Ekozashchita (Environmental Protection). “It’s just a black torrent that pours out of the pipe directly into the lagoon, and the lagoon is part of the sea.”

Poland’s waste compounds the problem. It accounts for 30 percent of emissions into the Baltic Sea. Sweden and Russia each dump in about 12 percent. The sewage pollution impacts everything between the point of dumping and the sea, including codfish, herring, shellfish and the people who eat them. The streams, rivers and groundwater are likely contaminated forever with sewage and prions, not to mention other toxins and carcinogens.

The entire region is swimming in sewage. Prion pollution from sewage also impacts the beaches and the people who play on them. It contaminates clothing and shoes. It contaminates boats of all sizes. Prions don’t need the help of mismanaged sewage to find pathways back to humans. Toxins in mismanaged sewage are contributing to cancer, endocrine system disruption and many other health issues.

Leaders in Alzheimer’s disease, Finland and Sweden dump their sewage into rivers and lakes, which is contaminating waterways and communities, while exposing families to various toxins and pathogens, including Pandora-like prions. This mismanagement is exposing millions of people, wildlife and livestock to the prion epidemic.

Towns and cities across the European Union are required to collect and treat their urban wastewater under the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive. In 2006, the European Commission took Finland and Sweden to the European Court of Justice for failing to ensure proper treatment of urban wastewater in a significant number of towns and cities. In 2010, Finland and Sweden again were cited for failing to install the proper infrastructure for collecting and treating urban wastewater. Unfortunately, sewage treatment of any sort doesn’t stop a prion, but sewage mismanagement is obviously an issue in the region and in these two countries, which are afflicted with abnormally high rates of neurodegenerative disorders.

“Finland and Sweden are rightly concerned about the state of the Baltic Sea. They can help make it healthier by improving their own wastewater treatment,” said EU Environment Commissioner Stavros Dimas.

cruise ships and sewage Baltic SeaCruise Ship Sewage Dumped At Sea

Cruise ships in the region also dump their sewage in the Baltic Sea. Last year, 261 international cruise ships pulled to port just in Helsinki. It’s legal to discharge untreated wastewater in international waters, as long as it is done at least twelve kilometers from the nearest coast. Finnish cruise lines stopped dumping wastewater in the Baltic in 2007.

In addition, Baltic countries generate about 3.5 million tons of dry sewage sludge every year. In the past, it was dumped in a variety of ways, including at sea. Sludge dumped into the Baltic has polluted the sea forever. Additional wastewater and sewage runoff just adds fuel to the fire.

Adding to the insanity, sewage sludge has been used in agriculture throughout the Baltic Sea Region for at least 40 years. It is used as a fertilizer. Unfortunately, crops and grass uptake prions and become infectious. The Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland have forbidden or restricted the agricultural disposal of sewage sludge. They incinerate it. Finland and Norway, however, dump sludge on green areas of all sorts.

Europe alone spends more than 2.2 billion euros every year getting rid of sewage sludge. About 60 percent of it goes toward agriculture and landscaping applications. Disposing of it safely would cost billions more. The same goes for every nation on the planet. It’s better to protect corporate profits than people or the planet?

Sewage mismanagement is not limited to the Baltic Sea region. Virtually every coastal city in the world dumps sewage in the sea. Boston, for example, dumps about 500 million gallons of sewage off the coast of Cape Cod every day. Many more cities dump it in rivers, streams and on crops. Cattle graze on it. Thanks to the creative marketing of biosolids, kids play on it and gardeners are using this death dust at home.

People, wildlife, marine life and livestock around the world are caught in the crossfire. Failure to address these issues will cost billions of lives. The body count is already in the millions.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Whales Are Bioindicators Of Neurological Disease In Iceland

Iceland is a different case study in sewage management and diet. It’s obviously not impacted by the problems of the Baltic Sea, but it could still serve as a canary in a coal mine.

First of all, Iceland is smart enough to not put sewage sludge on its farmlands. It disposes of it in landfills. Unfortunately, if these landfills aren’t capped and lined like a nuclear waste dump, water will leach through the prion pathogens and contaminate groundwater.

The main sources of sewage in Iceland are residential areas, fish processing, livestock, slaughtering, dairy industries, aquaculture, textile industries, tanning plants and some heavy industries. Both the industrial and domestic sewage is usually disposed through the same drainage into the sea. The majority of sewage in Iceland is released untreated into the ocean where it impacts coastal waters, fish, shellfish and waterfowl. It also could be impacting whales and dolphins. Even if the sewage were treated, the deadly prions would survive the process.

Hafnarfjordur, for example, is located on the coast just southwest of Reykjavik on the southwest coast of Iceland. The city of about 21,000 people has four sewage outlets that discharge directly into the bay where people fish, boat, golf and swim. Any sewage that escapes the bay is then driven up the western coast by the currents of the North Atlantic. Pardon my French, but it’s the equivalent of pissing into the wind. The damage done by sewage to Iceland’s coastal waters are well documented. Do you think that it’s contributing to the nation’s high rate of Alzheimer’s deaths? Do you think it’s a good idea to dump sewage where you eat and drink?

Neurological Disease In Whales

Whale meat also is a likely pathway that could be contributing to high rates of neurological disease in Nordic and Baltic nations. Whales and dolphins are vulnerable to prion disease. At least one dolphin has been found with prion disease, but testing is severely lacking. Since dietary factors are clearly linked to neurological disease, studying the correlation between diet and disease can help illuminate the prion problem.

As stated before, Alzheimer’s (and other diseases on the prion spectrum) are extremely high in the region. Pioneering research found that Parkinson’s patients on the Faroe Islands have consumed about six times more whale meat and blubber than their neighbors who don’t have the disease.

Maria Skaalum Petersen is working to shed light on the connection between sick seas, sick whales and the people who consume them. Petersen is a researcher in the Department of Occupational and Public Health in the Faroe Islands health service. One of her projects has included a comparison of the prevalence of Parkinson’s disease (part of the TSE spectrum) in the Nordic countries.

whale meat and neurological disease
Maria Skaalum hit the tip of an iceberg by connecting the consumption of pilot whales to neurological disease.

She found that Parkinson’s disease is twice as prevalent on the Faroe Islands as in Norway and other Nordic countries. A traditional diet on the Faroe Islands typically includes pilot whale meat.

Predators, including some whales, are high on the food chain. Animals that consume predators are consuming the toxic build-up from every animal ever consumed. Therefore, these predators (and the people who consume them) often serve as an excellent indicator of the health of an entire ecosystem, including prion contamination.

Not all whales are created equal, though. The whale meat sold in Norway and Iceland is mostly from minke whales, a species that has a diet much lower in the food chain. This means they do not accumulate as many contaminants or prions as pilot whales. This means that the risks associated with whale meat is slightly less for the people in Norway. However, as you recall from the chart above, Norway still has a fairly high rate of neurological disease.

eating pilot whales causes Parkinson's disease

“The Faroe Islanders eat pilot whales, while Norwegians eat baleen whales. Pilot whales have teeth and primarily eat fish and squid, which puts them higher on the food chain,” Petersen says.

Baleen whales feed by filtering zooplankton and krill into their mouths as they swim. Eating lower on the food chain lowers their prion exposure, but it doesn’t make them immune to the prion problem. More importantly, this study indicates that there is prion accumulation in whales–some more than others. It indicates that prions are in our oceans and onward upstream. It indicates that prions are in our food and water supplies and reckless sewage management is contributing to the problem. It reminds us of the hazards associated with wastewater reuse, sewage sludge disposal and biosolids in our communities and watersheds.

Prions have already left Pandora’s box. It’s easy to spot areas of mismanagement. If we fail to connect the dots and react soon enough, it won’t matter. What can we learn from the Baltic Sea, Iceland, the Faroe Islands and whales? Prions are building up in the environment and in mammals now. Eating infected mammals spreads the disease up the food chain.

public relations firm Alzheimer's disease

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Call 602-999-7204 (USA) or write to Gary Chandler to join our campaign and coalition for truth and reform. gary@crossbow1.com.

Alzheimer’s Disease Related To Chronic Wasting Disease

All Mammals Appear Vulnerable To Prion Epidemic

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is ravaging wildlife in many regions across North America. It’s part of a larger epidemic of neurological disease that is killing millions of people, wildlife and livestock around the world. Once again, wildlife are serving as the proverbial canary in a coal mine.

Biosolids land application

CWD is part of an incurable spectrum disease called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Mismanagement of pathogens associated with the disease are contributing to a broader epidemic of neurological disease among wildlife, livestock and people.

TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in deer. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure and there is no species barrier.

chronic wasting disease

TSEs, including chronic wasting disease, are caused by a deadly protein called a prion(PREE-on). Prion disease is unstoppable. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Victims can spread the disease even further via their bodily fluids and cell tissue. Victims often are contagious long before they appear sick. Their saliva, urine, blood and feces, for example, spread the pathogen further every day. Prions linger in the environment and on objects infinitely. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Because of the dynamics, Canada has declared CWD unstoppable.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to CWD and the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Thanks to sewage, biosolidsreclaimed sewage water and feedlot waste, we’re recycling the prion pathogen that causes neurological disease right back into our watersheds, which we share with deer, elk, moose, livestock and other creatures that are vulnerable to prion disease. Rain, wind and irrigation spread deadly prions further everyday. Healthy wildlife are being exposed to deadly prions through food, water, air and contact with infected animals.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Since prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims, sewage mismanagement is a top concern. Wastewater treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. Therefore, putting biosolids on crops and dumping sewage sludge throughout our watersheds is a very bad idea. Dumping sewage from billions of people on land and at sea creates deadly prion freeways.

Every sewage system in the world has been used by a person, if not millions of people, with Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Sewage systems have become prion incubators. Biosolids, water reuse and sewage sludge disposal have made them potent prion distributors. The waste from feedlots is likely contributing to the problem as well.

Although there are multiple causes of prion disease, including Alzheimer’s disease and CWD, reckless policies are contributing to an environmental nightmare. Sick deer, elk, moose and other wildlife and marine life are just a symptom of a much bigger problem. Putting these Pandora-like pathogens back in the box is impossible. However, that is not a license to dump them right into the lifecycle.

Read the full story about the connection between Alzheimer’s disease, chronic wasting disease and other aspects of the prion epidemic at http://crossbowcommunications.com/chronic-wasting-disease-a-byproduct-of-sewage-mismanagement/

Alzheimer’s Disease Spreading Through Sewage, Bodily Fluids

Neurodegenerative Disease The Fastest-Growing Cause Of Death

Approximately 50 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. It’s the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. Thanks to misdiagnoses and misinformation, we don’t understand the full scope of the tidal wave that’s hitting millions of new victims every year.

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” In fact, new research from Duke University indicates that caregivers of those with dementia are six times more likely to contract the disease than people who are not caregivers. That number will prove to be much higher.

Alzheimer's disease and caregivers

The TSE epidemic represents an environmental nightmare that threatens every mammal on Earth. Related diseases are killing wildlife and livestock around the world. Marine mammals also are vulnerable.

TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in deer. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure and there is no species barrier.

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). Prion disease is unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through bodily fluids and cell tissue. Prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices, restaurants and many other places infinitely. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Thanks to modern sewage disposal practices, prions are building up in our water supplies. They also are contaminating our crops, parks and yards.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Victims of the disease can spread the disease even further via bodily fluids and cell tissue. Victims often are contagious long before they appear sick. Their saliva, urine, blood and feces help spread the pathogen further as they struggle to survive.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for identifying, naming and studying deadly prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. The importance of his research continues to unfold.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and even ALS are prion diseases similar, if not identical, to CJD in people, mad cow disease in livestock and chronic wasting disease in wildlife. The variations in disease progression could be due to genetics in the patients or mutations in the prion, not different diseases entirely. Prion disease is prion disease.

Although there are many factors contributing to the prion disease epidemic, many lethal pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. As such, we are recycling the pathogen that causes Alzheimer’s right back into our food and water. We’re dumping these killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, ski areas and school grounds. Rain and irrigation spread them throughout our communities and watersheds. We’re dumping prions into our food and water supplies with foolish sewage management practices.

A new study confirms that people and animals dying of prion disease are contaminating the environment around them with a deadly and unstoppable protein found in their bodily fluids.

Dr. Claudio Soto prion research

Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the George and Cynthia W. Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Brain Related Illnesses at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found human prions in urine. The study has been published in the August 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The good news is that the research offers hope for earlier diagnosis among the millions of people impacted around the world. The discovery can promote earlier intervention and better disease management. It also can help develop screens to protect our blood supplies from donors with prion disease.

The bad news is that prions in urine, mucus, feces and blood underscore the environmental nightmare associated with Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD), Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and prion diseases among livestock and wildlife. Although there are many causes for prion disease, many people and animals are contracting it from environmental exposure (food, water and soil) and then contaminating the environment even more with their own bodily fluids. Once victims die, carcasses also contaminate soil and water.

chronic wasting disease

“This is the first time that prions have been detected in human urine,” Dr. Soto told Neurology Today.

Soto failed to reference urine and blood studies performed earlier by Ruth Gabizon in 2001 and Reichl in 2002. These studies also detected prions in bodily fluids. Despite that detail, Soto’s findings can help focus global attention on the exploding prion problem.

Additional research has determined that the prion pathogen spreads through feces, saliva, blood, milk, soil, water and the tissue of infected animals and humans. If a single person with prion disease discharges bodily fluids or feces into a public sewer system, that sewage system is permanently infected and the amount of contamination will multiply and intensify daily. Everything discharged from that sewage system—reclaimed water and biosolids—can spread the contamination even further.

land application sewage sludge and disease

Once a prion reaches the soil, that soil is permanently contaminated and the entire watershed (water) below that point is at risk forever. Dr. Soto also announced recently that at least some plants grown in sewage sludge and other mediums contaminated with infectious prions can uptake those prions and become infectious. If your food and water is generated in such a watershed, you have a higher risk of contracting prion disease with every sip of water or every bite of food produced locally.

With the help of weather, prions can migrate through wind and water. Rain and snow can rinse them into surface water, groundwater, streams, ponds, lakes, and oceans. Wildlife, livestock and humans can ingest prions from soil, water and food. We can’t afford to take the risk of further contaminating entire watersheds – increasing the pathway to humans, livestock, and wildlife downstream.

Valley Fever caused by land application of sewage sludge

This transmissible family of disease is unstoppable for many reasons. In addition, once items are exposed to victims of prion disease, they can never be sterilized again.

Because of these factors and others, we have an epidemic of prion disease exploding around the world right now. The epidemic is worse in some regions of the world than others. For example, the death rate for Alzheimer’s is higher in Finland than any other country in the world. Iceland and the United States are runners up. In fact, the death rate for Alzheimer’s is higher in Washington state than any other known region in the world. These vast discrepancies can only be explained by environmental factors, including food, water and air pathways. Sewage disposal that contaminates local food and water supplies is likely part of the problem.

Alzheimer’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indistinguishable. They are essentially the same disease. Medical professionals cannot tell the difference and it’s commonly known in the medical industry that the diagnoses are only a guess and that misdiagnoses are common—if there’s even a substantial difference between Alzheimer’s and CJD. It appears that CJD is caused by a more aggressive mutation of prion than Alzheimer’s, but a deadly prion is a deadly prion. There is no reason to believe that some prions behave differently than others in disease transmission and progression.

The urine and sewage connection helps explain why the global epidemic is exploding. More than 50 million people around the world are known to have these neurodegenerative diseases today. Millions more have the disease, but don’t know it, yet. In addition to these people, millions of infected people around the world have used our sewage systems over the past century. Millions more are using them today. It’s impossible to neutralize or stop prions in even the most sterile environments, including hospitals. It’s ludicrous to think that treated sewage water or biosolids are prion-free. Especially since prions from people are much more infectious than those found in other species (prions become more aggressive as they work their way up the food chain).

sewage treatment plant LASS

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within sewage processing plants. This lack of directive allows budget-strapped states and counties to regulate the practices in a variety of ways that best suit local municipalities and industries.

Dr. Soto’s test changes that equation. Now, the EPA can’t plead ignorance to the dangers of prions in biosolids and reclaimed sewage water. Sewage dumped at sea must be reconsidered. Prions should again be classified as a select agent by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Center for Disease Control. Similar measures should be enacted around the world immediately. Failure to act responsibly is suicide.

Unfortunately, testing will confirm that every sewage system in the world has served people with Alzheimer’s disease and CJD. As such, prions have been incubating, multiplying and migrating out of these systems for many years. The problem is intensifying within and beyond these sewage systems every day.

According to the U.S. EPA, “Prions are extremely resistant to inactivation by ultraviolet light, irradiation, boiling, dry heat, formaline, freezing, drying and changes in pH. Methods for inactivating prions in infected tissues or wastes include incineration at very high temperatures and alkaline hydrolysis.” They didn’t mention hydrogen peroxide, which is how some toilet-to-tap programs hope to kill deadly prions. 

The EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure. The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its questionable risk assessments regarding biosolids. The EPA reserves the right to adjust these risk assessments, however, as the test of time disproves its pseudo-science.

joel pedersen prion research

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Pedersen’s research also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment or pellet production processes can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Meanwhile, we’re spreading tons of biosolids (sewage sludge) on farmland every day to produce our food. Organic food operations, including fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy are not immune to prion exposure. Research confirms that plants uptake prions and prions certainly contaminate leafy matter and the skin of fruits and vegetables upon contact.

biosolids land application

We’re dumping biosolids on parks and golf courses and our backyards where we live and play. Coastal cities and ocean vessels dump their sewage right into the ocean, where prions can enter the food chain again, while washing back on our favorite beaches.

We’re dumping millions of tons of contaminated sewage into the oceans, rivers and on cropland around the world every day. We’re spraying reclaimed wastewater on our parks, golf courses and crops. In some cases, people are drinking reclaimed wastewater that has been recycled to their taps. Municipalities, water companies and sewage districts face new liabilities as never seen before.

The new urine study primarily references what is called variant CJD (vCJD is the supposed strain of prion that causes mad cow disease). I argue that a deadly prion is a deadly prion and all prion diseases should be managed assuming that prions are in the urine of all victims. There is no species barrier. There is no cure. There is no reason to assume that prion diseases referred to as Alzheimer’s, CJD, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and others are different from each other.

Based on this premise, caregivers and family members must arm themselves with facts that can save their lives. Simple acts can expose family and caregivers to the prion contagion. For example, many household items, including utensils and dishes that belong to people who have Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s are likely infected from saliva. It’s unsafe for others to use these items and people should not donate them to charity.

Despite the mass confusion and concern regarding prion disease, protective and sterilization protocols for Alzheimer’s and CJD are not the same and millions of people are being exposed to prion disease because of false securities. CJD is just the tip of a deadly, incurable iceberg and we all should sit up and pay attention right now. We’re recklessly allowing caregivers and stakeholders to expose themselves and others to the problem.

Although there are multiple causes of, and pathways for, prion disease, reckless policies around the world are contributing to the unstoppable epidemic. It’s spreading further every day. Stakeholders must arm themselves with facts that can promote reform because all infected mammals shed infectious prions in their blood, saliva, mucus, urine and feces. Prions also have been found in milk. In essence, the entire body of a victim is contaminated and must be managed accordingly.

With these risks in mind, we need many reforms to safeguard human health and environmental pathways. We are experts on the issue of prion disease, pathway management. We have influenced public opinion and public policy around the world. Please join us in the pursuit of truth and reform.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Preview and order the eBook now.

Learn More At: http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-epidemic-fueled-by-sewage-mismanagement/

public relations firm Alzheimer's disease

Crossbow Communications is a full-service advertising agency and public relations firm in Denver, Colorado and Phoenix, Arizona. The firm specializes in issue management and public affairs.

Wastewater Reuse Contributing To Alzheimer’s Disease Epidemic

Killer Proteins Unstoppable In Sewage

San Diego’s City Council approved plans to recycle sewage water into drinking water. It’s a growing trend that short-sells a proven health risk associated with deadly proteins.

In my opinion, San Diego joined a growing global movement in what could become a human health disaster. The move could be a death sentence for millions of people who will drink reclaimed wastewater. That same water will contaminate their homes, gardens and offices with a highly contagious and unstoppable pathogen called a prion–an infectious form of protein. The exposure can cause neurological disorders in mammals, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

A coalition of community leaders, business groups and environmental organizations sold the plan to citizens as the best way to reduce reliance on imported water, while creating a large, drought-proof water supply. Environmental groups claim that the Pure Water project will mean less sewage dumped into the ocean and less reliance on desalination (and purification of that same ocean water that they use as a sewage dump).

Councilman Scott Sherman said San Diego must fight sharply rising costs for imported water, which has more than doubled since 2009. The price tag for the recycled water is currently higher than that of imported water.

The project, dubbed Pure Water San Diego, is expected to provide more than a third of the city’s potable water by 2035. When Pure Water is built out in 20 years, it is should generate 83 million gallons a day of “clean” water.

The system starts with micro-filtration, where rows of plastic tubes and straws filter out microbes and other contaminants. The big stuff.

The water then goes through reverse-osmosis to screen out organic material, salts and other solids. But all pathogens still are essentially untreated.

The last step is a combination of ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide to kill anything left. Pathogens resistant to UV light or hydrogen peroxide are destined for your tap.

As any surgeon worth his or her salt can tell you, UV light and hydrogen peroxide can kill many things if properly exposed, but they can’t kill a prion. In fact, there is not any known treatment in the world that is 100 percent effective against deadly prions in any environment, especially water. Hospitals safely discard surgical instruments used on patients with prion disease. Prions are more likely to migrate, mutate and multiply than be neutralized (they aren’t a virus or bacteria, so they can’t be killed).

The “treated” water from the proposed San Diego system could be mixed into the San Vicente Reservoir and piped to customers, or the city could route the water directly into the distribution system. Once exposed to deadly prions, the waterways will be contaminated forever–serving as incubators and distributors of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease.

The Orange County water reclamation program was recently featured on CBS’ 60 Minutes. Reporter Lesley Stahl bravely drank a sample of treated sewage water during the story. As she explained, San Diego won’t be the first to drink its own sewage. A number of other cities around the world have already sold their souls down the river based on half-truths and misinformation. Orange County, for example, recycles 70 million gallons a day to potable. It’s expanding capacity to 100 million gallons per day.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

The Problem With Prions and Prion Disease

If not for one tiny detail, I would be more open-minded and supportive of the practice of recycling wastewater. That microscopic detail is called a prion—the deadly and unstoppable protein behind the exploding Alzheimer’s epidemic, mad cow disease and other neurological disorders that are killing millions of people, wildlife and livestock around the world.

Alzheimer's disease infectious disease

A new study confirms that people and animals dying of prion disease are contaminating the environment around them with a deadly and unstoppable protein found in their bodily fluids. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the George and Cynthia W. Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Brain Related Illnesses at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found prions in urine. The study has been published in the August 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Please Read The Full Story: http://crossbowcommunications.com/san-diego-should-reconsider-plan-to-drink-recycled-wastewater/