Food, Water, Air Contamination Fueling Brain Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease, Autism Now Industrial Diseases

The EPA is drawing more attention and criticism than usual lately, but its history of mismanagement is nothing new.

EPA failures regarding wastewater treatment, reuse and the land application of sewage sludge go back decades. For example, sewage sludge was deemed too toxic to dump in the ocean in 1972, so the EPA started pimping it as fertilizer for our food supply, gardens, parks and school grounds.

Sewage sludge certainly has some beneficial nutrients for plants, including phosphorous and nitrogen. Unfortunately, the so-called biosolids also include pathogens, prions, heavy metals, pharmaceutical residues, carcinogens and other harmful ingredients. After all, sewage comes from slaughter houses, nursing homes, hospitals, dental offices, veterinarians, street runoff, factories, and beyond. It also includes all of the things that millions of homes choose to dump.

land application sewage sludge

The EPA never conducted a legitimate risk assessment regarding the land application of sewage sludge. It never issued official policy. It issued something known to industry insiders as the sludge rule back in the 1990s. It’s the government equivalent of a wink-wink.

The EPA stood behind the sludge rule and allowed each state to develop random regulations and practices on sewage discharges. Places such as Milwaukee, Wisconsin started pimping its sewage sludge as fertilizer long ago. In Milwaukee, they branded the toxins Milorganite, which is registered for sale in all 50 states. Farmers are eating the stuff up. So do livestock, crops, gardeners and our wildlife. It’s running off into streams, rivers, lakes and oceans. Tornadoes carry it into the sky and into homes, offices and schools. The treated wastewater is discharged to Lake Michigan, where Chicago and other municipalities tap drinking water.

Since the EPA’s infamous sludge rule darkened our world, we now know about a deadly form of protein known as a prion. Prions are in the bodily fluids of victims, including blood, saliva, mucus, urine, feces, etc.—everything that’s destined for a wastewater treatment plant and a farmer’s field (or a soccer field).

Prions aren’t alive, so they can’t be killed. Wastewater treatment does little more than separate the stuff that floats from the stuff that doesn’t float. What’s left is pumped right back into your world. Including wastewater that’s being touted as drinking water (per the next section, look for the word “prion” in the risk assessments).

Prion disease and Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1998 for his study of prions and prion disease. Unfortunately, government and industry are ignoring the ramifications of his science. As such, neurodegenerative disease is now the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. The autism epidemic is likely related to the same mismanagement of neurotoxins. Meanwhile, valley fever has evolved into an umbrella term for a variety of ailments spread through infectious waste in soil and air.

Prion disease is prion disease, but misguided public servants are blinding us with pseudo science. We know that prions migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Yet, we are being told that various threats are unproven. We are being told that prions deplete themselves.

We are being told that there is no connection between the various forms of prion diseases among humans and other mammals, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease, and mad cow disease.

We are told that autism is caused by vaccines, not food and water contamination. We are being told that infectious waste is fertilizer. It’s time to read between the lines and think for ourselves, while we can still think at all.

The wastewater treatment plant in Milwaukee, for example, has been serving people with prion disease for decades. Wastewater treatment plants around the world are prion collectors, incubators and distributors. As more and more people get neurodegenerative disease, the deadlier the waste stream becomes. They have become weapons of mass destruction, yet no regulation exists. Highly toxic garbage in—fertilizer out.

land application sewage sludge and disease

Prions + Pathways = Victims

Humans Transmitting Prion Disease To Wildlife

Thanks to the indiscriminate dumping of sewage sludge laden with prions from sick people, the dairy state is a now a leader in chronic wasting disease among its wildlife. Since wildlife are serving as the proverbial bird in a coal mine, we know that livestock and humans also are being poisoned. The prion pathway goes both directions–people can contract it from infected animals and animals can contract it from human infectious waste (sewage). Few, if any mammals are immune. Few corners of the earth are safe.

The risk assessments for biosolids and wastewater reclamation were prepared before the world of science knew about deadly, unstoppable prions. Prions don’t deplete themselves over time. They don’t have a half-life. They migrate, mutate and multiply. Prions are being mismanaged in a criminal way on an industrial scale.

Although there are several pathways for deadly prion disease to infect a herd, the greatest prion pathway is being ignored. Sick deer, elk, moose and reindeer are just canaries in a proverbial coal mine. You and your family are caught in the crossfire of misinformation and mismanagement. Neurodegenerative disease is now the fastest-growing cause of death in the world.

Municipalities around the world were asked to stop dumping their sewage sludge in rivers and oceans and start dumping the toxic soup onto farms, forests, parks, school grounds, gardens and golf courses. Cities also are dumping the toxins in the deserts around the world, where it bakes and blows back in the faces of the cities that are trying to get rid of the sewage. The death dust from sewage sludge alone includes infectious waste, radioactive waste, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical residues and other threats.

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Humans Transmitting Brain Disease To Humans

Most forms of neurodegenerative disease are prion disease. The clinical term is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Victims are producing and discharging infectious waste. Prions from people are the most deadly and aggressive because people are at the top of the food chain. It’s a vicious cycle. People are giving it back and forth to each other, but in different mutations. People are transmitting prion disease to animals through sewage. Animals are transmitting it to people through milk and meat. Government and industry are fanning the flames.

Thanks to modern sewage disposal (biosolids) and antiquated (if not fraudulent) risk assessments, we’re witnessing a public health disaster that’s still unfolding in the form of autism, Alzheimer’s disease, west Nile virus, Zika virus, chronic wasting disease, mad cow disease, valley fever, meningitis, hepatitis, and other threats to public health.

The spike in autism and Alzheimer’s disease began shortly after we started dumping toxic sewage on open lands in urban and rural areas. The spike in chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease began about the same time. It’s time to divert all sewage sludge to lined landfills to protect human health, animal health and entire watersheds. Infectious waste isn’t fertilizer.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

Answers To Alzheimer’s Begin With The Truth

President Ronald Reagan designated November as National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month in 1983. At the time, fewer than 2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s; today, the number of people diagnosed (and still alive) with the disease has soared to nearly 5.4 million. The X factor is the millions who are going undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

Mayors in cities around the nation are declaring November Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness and Caregivers Month.

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth-leading cause, and the fastest-growing cause, of death in the United States (and the world), which has some of the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the world. Finland, Sweden and Iceland also are at the top of the list. However, states such as Washington, North Dakota and South Dakota rival the rates found in Scandinavian countries.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease is going undiagnosed and misdiagnosed at an escalating pace. Many people, for example, have had diagnoses withheld by their doctors. The epidemic is more widespread than anyone knows. Physicians have withheld millions of diagnoses from patients and their families. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physicians in the U.S. only inform 45 percent of patients about their Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The same suppression is likely at work in most countries. Meanwhile, millions more go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

A groundbreaking study suggested that Alzheimer’s disease causes six times as many deaths as the official statistics would indicate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that, in 2010, Alzheimer’s caused almost 84,000 deaths in the United States, a number derived from death certificates in which Alzheimer’s disease was listed as the main cause. But, in reality, the study said Alzheimer’s was the underlying cause in more than 500,000 deaths in 2010 that were often attributed to conditions, such as pneumonia, caused by complications of Alzheimer’s. Those numbers make Alzheimer’s disease the third-leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer. The study was led by researchers at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and published in 2013 in the medical journal Neurology.

Meanwhile, no one is talking about the fact that most forms of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, is transmissible. Spouses of those with Alzheimer’s disease, for example, are 600 percent more likely to contract the disease. Other caregivers also are in harm’s way. In fact, entire communities are at risk of exposure.

prion disease spectrum

According to neuroscientists Dr. Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones but it has not been declared a reportable disease in the U.S. and many other nations. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The disease is now striking young people, including teenagers, with much greater frequency. It’s also killing clusters of people in the same communities with greater frequency.

It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. Informed neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risk of transmission. They are making diagnoses from across the room.

“Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

On average, Alzheimer’s follows a 14-year course from onset of symptoms until death. For most patients, symptoms go undiagnosed and untreated for at least seven years. For most patients, symptoms go undiagnosed and untreated for at least seven years, during which time the lesions spread through the brain and cause irreparable damage, said Dennis Fortier, author of the Brain Today blog.

 

“With a good diet, physical exercise, social engagement, and certain drugs, many patients (especially those detected at an early stage) can meaningfully alter the course of Alzheimer’s and preserve their quality of life,” Fortier said. “No cure does not mean that there is no treatment.”

The health of the brain is affected by our overall health. Research shows that high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and obesity increase the risk for cognitive decline. A healthy brain requires strong blood flow and plenty of oxygen.

Meanwhile, we can’t forget that:

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Spouses of those with Alzheimer’s disease are 600% more likely to contract the disease, which is further evidence that it is a transmissible disease. Caregivers, family members and others are in harm’s way because of disease mismanagement and misinformation;
  • People in Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease. Rates in North Dakota, South Dakota and Washington rival the highest rates in the world. Sewage mismanagement and the mismanagement of other forms of infectious waste are responsible for much of the epidemic in these regions and beyond;

We can’t ignore that the global Alzheimer’s disease epidemic and the autism epidemic both began to rise in the late 1970s. They proceeded to spike dramatically in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The spikes in autism and Alzheimer’s disease are almost identical in terms of timing and trajectory. The surge in chronic wasting disease among deer also follows the same trend. These devastating diseases are symptoms of a much bigger problem associated with toxic and infectious waste. Industry policies and practices changed dramatically, which triggered an explosion in brain disease.

According to a 2010 study by the Centers for Disease Control, Utah, North Carolina and New Jersey have the highest rates of autism. ASD strikes one in every 32 Utah boys, and one in every 85 girls. In New Jersey, one in every 28 boys has ASD. The numbers are likely still rising.

Thanks to modern sewage disposal and antiquated risk assessments, we’re witnessing a public health disaster that’s still unfolding in the form of autism, Alzheimer’s disease, west Nile virus, Zika virus, chronic wasting disease, valley fever, meningitis, hepatitis, and other threats to public health.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Read more about the autism epidemic and its connection to infectious proteins and other neurotoxins that are spreading through biosolids and wastewater reclamation. Please contact us to share your insights, opinions and support for critical reforms.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise.

 

Neurodegenerative Disease A Global Epidemic

Neurodegenerative Disease The Fastest Growing Cause Of Death

Death rates from heart disease and cancer are dropping globally due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management. Meanwhile, neurodegenerative disease is exploding because it’s highly contagious in most cases.

In the U.S., deaths from Alzheimer’s disease increased 71 percent from 2000 to 2013, while those attributed to heart disease decreased 14 percent. Similar trends are emerging around the world. Unfortunately, the global spike in autism shares the same timing and trajectory as the surge in neurodegenerative disease. It’s not just a coincidence. The correlation is real thanks to reckless policies and practices. It appears that the biggest difference between autism and classic forms of neurodegenerative disease is age of onset.

The actual epidemic is larger than anyone knows. Physicians are withholding millions of diagnoses from patients and their families. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physicians in the U.S. only inform 45 percent of patients about their Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. The same suppression is likely at work in most countries. Meanwhile, millions more go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Women face an elevated risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing prions (PREE-ons) and prion disease, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Prions are a deadly and unstoppable form of protein that migrates, mutates, multiplies and kills with unparalleled efficiency.

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. Unfortunately, Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we all are facing a public health disaster because of the negligence and reckless disregard for public health.

TSE is a spectrum disease also known as prion disease. The spectrum includes Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and an extremely aggressive version known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Prusiner claims that all forms of TSE are caused by infectious prions. The prion spectrum varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. When the presenting symptom is memory loss, the diagnoses flow along the following chart.

prion disease spectrum

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. The most savvy neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risk of infection. They are making diagnoses from across the room. Unfortunately, caregivers aren’t warned accordingly.

“CJD behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

According to neuroscientist Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

Prions are now the X factor and they are not being accounted for by industry or government. Prions are an infectious form of glycoprotein that can spread throughout the body.

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A recent study published in the journal Nature also renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence. There is no evidence that Alzheimer’s disease is not infectious to other mammals.

Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions because prions are in the urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva of each victim.

Alzheimer's disease infectious disease

Not only are homes, hospitals and nursing homes exposed to the deadly prion pathogen from those with prion disease, so are entire sewage treatment systems and their by-products. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators and distributors. The sewage sludge and wastewater released are spreading disease far and wide. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues confirmed the presence of prions in urine.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said.

joel pedersen prion research

“Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. It’s reported that prions released from people are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Sewage from hospitals, nursing homes, slaughterhouses, morgues, mortuaries, veterinarians and other high-risk places enters the same sewage system. Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, sewage systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Wastewater treatment systems are now prion incubators and distributors.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, the EPA’s risk assessment on sewage sludge and biosolids were prepared before the world of science knew about prions. The agency continues to cling to it’s antiquated sludge rule crafted back in the dark ages. It does, however, consider prions a “emerging contaminant of concern.” Meanwhile, its outdated risk assessments are promoting a public health disaster.

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Researchers have more questions than answers about brain disease, but we know that neurotoxins, head trauma and genetics can all trigger neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately, that’s where our knowledge gets fuzzy.

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease. TSEs also have the potential of being transmitted from humans to animals. The most common example is chronic wasting disease among deer species. Deer, elk, moose, reindeer and many other animals are being exposed to infectious waste in sewage.

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Wastewater treatment doesn’t touch prions. In fact, these facilities are now helping incubate and distribute prions via solids and wastewater released.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more. Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

Prions shed from humans are the most deadly. They demand more respect than radiation. They’re being ignored by regulators and industry alike. As such, food and water sources are being contaminated with the deadliest forms of prions. Homes, nursing homes, hospitals, clinics and restaurants are other examples of public places that are being contaminated by prions from victims of prion disease.

The deadly prion spectrum also includes mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease among deer. Scientists have shown that infected tissues can transmit prion disease between animals. There is no species barrier.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

wastewater treatment plant

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop deadly prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. Dumping sewage sludge (biosolids) from billions of people on land and at sea spreads prions far and wide. It also spreads heavy metals, radioactive waste, carcinogens, pharmaceuticals and more. It’s time for the truth. It’s time for reforms that can safeguard us from this public health disaster.

Read more about the correlation between Alzheimer’s disease, autism and sewage mismanagement. http://alzheimerdisease.tv/autism/

autism population

Background On Sewage Sludge

In 1972, world leaders admitted that dumping highly toxic sewage sludge into the oceans killed entire underwater ecosystems and threatened public health. Some nations stopped the dumping immediately and started dumping it on land or burning it in incinerators. The most responsible cities started putting sewage sludge in landfills. Meanwhile, the United States allowed cities to keep dumping sewage sludge at sea for another 20 years. It finally passed the Ocean Dumping Ban Act of 1988, when beaches along the east coast were forced to close because of high levels of pathogens from sewage that washed up on shore.

land application sewage sludge and disease

The law prohibited all dumping of industrial waste and municipal sewage sludge into our oceans after December 31, 1991. It did nothing however, to keep cities such as Boston and Los Angeles from dumping millions of gallons of raw sewage directly into the oceans every day, but with the help of the U.S. EPA, the Act did redirect millions of tons of deadly toxins and pathogens from our oceans to farms, ranches, national forests, city parks, golf courses, playgrounds, fair grounds, race tracks, sport fields and beyond. From there, the pathogens began contaminating food, water and air as they were soaked up by crops, swept away by rainwater and picked up by windstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes and dumped on innocent citizens where they live, work and play. The runoff still contaminates our oceans after it filters through our creeks, lakes and rivers.

After the 1991 ban on ocean dumping, the EPA instituted a policy of sewage sludge reuse on agricultural land. It hired a PR firm to spin a new brand for the death dirt. They crafted the clever name “biosolids” to help disguise the hazards. The EPA promoted biosolids recycling throughout the 1990s. Unfortunately, the risk assessments were severely biased and flawed. The proof is in the pudding.

This new form of sewage dispersal has sparked a public health disaster that’s still unfolding in the form of autism, Alzheimer’s disease, west Nile virus, Zika virus, chronic wasting disease, meningitis, hepatitis, and other threats to public health. The risk assessments for these practices failed to account for heavy metals, pharmaceutical residue, radionuclides, carcinogens and a deadly form of protein known as a prion (which was unknown to the world of science at the time). The practice sparked a public health disaster in exchange for healthier oceans and a very profitable new industry. The EPA even took its show on the road and convinced other nations to use its faulty risk assessments to justify multi-million dollar contracts for these new corporations. Countries such as Canada took the bait hook, line and sinker and never conducted its own risk assessments.

Chronic wasting disease is now rampant among deer and elk in Canada and it recently jumped the Atlantic to Norway’s reindeer herd. It’s spreading across the U.S. like wildfire as we spread more pathogens and lies. Land application sites often involve locations where poverty is high and economic prosperity is low, which means resistance is low. Sludge tends to be dumped where minorities live, leading to allegations of environmental racism. Unfortunately, contaminated food and water make it back to the cities where the infectious waste originated.

Treated sewage sludge has been used in the UK, Europe and China agriculturally for more than 80 years, though there is increasing pressure in some countries to stop the practice of land application due to farm land contamination and public outrage. In the 1990s there was pressure in some European countries to ban the use of sewage sludge as a fertilizer. Switzerland, Sweden, Austria, and others introduced a ban to safeguard public health. Others should follow their example.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Call 602-999-7204 or write to Gary Chandler to join our campaign and coalition for truth and reform. gary@crossbow1.com. Together, we can prevent Alzheimer’s disease and autism.

Wastewater Treatment Plants Spreading Brain Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease An Infectious Disease

Neurodegenerative diseases are the fastest-growing causes of death around the world. The mismanagement of infectious waste is contributing to the epidemic.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for his pioneering research on deadly prions—an infectious form of protein that connects a deadly spectrum disease called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in deer, elk, moose and reindeer. TSE is also killing dolphins, whales, camels and many other species of mammals. It’s the environmental equivalent of Pandora’s Box. Actually, it’s Pandora’s Lunchbox.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his work. Unfortunately, this groundbreaking research is being ignored. This negligence is fueling a public health disaster around the world, as critical pathways are being ignored and mismanaged. The mismanagement also is contributing to the global surge in autism.

In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and even ALS are prion diseases similar, if not identical, to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The primary difference being which part of the brain the disease attacks first. The other variable is that there are now an unknown number of prion mutations. Mutations of these deadly prions are the common denominator between all forms of TSEs. Most of the carnage is being swept under the rug as the problem escalates.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins.”

Although there are many causes contributing to prion disease, many people and animals are contracting it from environmental exposure (food, water and soil) and then contaminating the environment even more with their own bodily fluids. Victims of prion disease are walking time bombs. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most deadly form of prion disease in humans. Without dispute, it is a very contagious disease that kills rapidly. There is no cure for CJD, Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease.

Alzheimer’s and CJD are often indistinguishable to neurologists and general practitioners. Misdiagnoses are common. It appears that CJD is caused by a more aggressive mutation of prion than Alzheimer’s, but a deadly prion is a deadly prion. There is no reason to believe that some prions behave differently than others in disease transmission and progression. There should be no difference in disease management.

Unfortunately, as more people contract these brain diseases, the more deadly wastewater streams become. Meanwhile, wastewater reuse is surging around the world in response to growing populations and dwindling water resources. Other by-products from the wastewater stream known as biosolids (sewage sludge) also are being used to fertilize crops, pastures for livestock, golf courses, playgrounds and gardens. Millions of people, including your family, are in harm’s way because wastewater treatment plants can’t stop prions.

joel pedersen prion research

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems.

Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are absorbed by plants and vegetables grown in sewage sludge.”

Regulators and industry are playing dumb as the body count keeps rising. It’s a deadly circle enabled by an outdated risk assessment. Modern science is being ignored.

The largest prion pathway in the world is wastewater (infectious waste) from homes, hospitals, nursing homes, slaughterhouses, dental offices and other high-risk sources. The problem is that prions are in all bodily fluids and cell tissue of millions of victims who often go undiagnosed. Their mucus, saliva, feces, and urine are flushed down millions of toilets and rinsed down sinks every day. Once inside the wastewater system, prions proceed to migrate, mutate and multiply. Reckless risk assessments enable wastewater treatment plants to spread these deadly agents far and wide. Deadly prions are building up and incubating in wastewater treatment plants and then dumped openly on land. They are swept into the air by the wind. Now, water contaminated by prions is migrating into our rivers, lakes and oceans. It’s being injected into groundwater and it’s being recycled as tap water.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

I used to support wastewater reclamation and reuse projects until I realized that the risk assessments were prepared decades ago—before Dr. Prusiner characterized prions and prion disease. These microscopic protein particles have converted sewage and its by-products a public health disaster.

Read The Full Story About Prion Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease At http://crossbowcommunications.com/wastewater-reclamation-reuse-based-on-outdated-risk-assessments/

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Autism Rates Still Rising Globally

One In 68 U.S. Kids Have Autism

One in 68 children in the United States have now been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, according to new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention numbers released Thursday (some reports claim that the rate is one in 50). The latest estimate is roughly 30 percent higher than the CDC’s previous measure, released in 2012, which found that 1 in 88 children had autism, based on health and education records.

autism spectrum disorder cause

According to the new report, among 8-year-olds living in one of 11 CDC surveillance areas across the country in 2010, roughly 14.7 in every 1,000 had autism, though there were some regional differences in rates — many of them pronounced. In New Jersey, for example, 1 in 45 children had been identified with autism, compared to just 1 in 175 in Alabama.

Overall, the new report mirrors earlier estimates, finding that autism is roughly five times more common in boys than in girls. One in 42 boys were affected, compared to just 1 in 189 girls. White children were more likely to be identified with autism than black or Hispanic children.

The global prevalence of autism has increased twenty- to thirtyfold since the first population studies were conducted in Europe in the late 1960s and ’70s, according to background information provided in the new report. At that time, research suggested that only 1 in 2,500 children in Europe were affected by autism.

The CDC began tracking autism rates in the U.S. in 2000 with the establishment of itsAutism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, which relies on health and education records. Early estimates found that autism affected roughly 1 in every 150 children — a number that has steadily increased with each subsequent report. (A separate 2013 CDC report estimated that 1 in every 50 children in the U.S. have an autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, although that was based on parental reports, not official records.)

It’s still not precisely known what is causing the steady rise in autism diagnosis.

“There has certainly been an increase in awareness, and that drives families toward earlier action … It drives them to ask questions at earlier ages, and it also increases the probability of detection,” Rob Ring, chief science officer with the nonprofit Autism Speaks, told The Huffington Post. “We also know that surveillance itself is improving. Groups like the American Academy of Pediatrics have instituted guidelines for screening, which increase the chances of picking up kids who have been missed previously.”

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Ring added that the diagnostic criteria for autism has changed over the years, most recently with the release of DSM-5 — the so-called “bible” of modern psychiatry. Among other things, the new edition of the DSM has folded Asperger’s syndrome into the broader category of ASD.

“But that’s not the full picture,” said Ring. “We know that risk factors such as increasing parental age are likely adding modestly to increases as well. Science continues to reveal interesting interactions between genetics and the environment.”

Autism is a spectrum disorder, meaning there is a wide range in the ways and degrees to which it affects people. Its cause is unknown, though it is generally thought to be a combination of genetic and non-genetic factors.

Notably, the new report found that most children tend to be diagnosed after age 4, despite advances that have made it possible for diagnosis to happen as early as age 2. That figure suggests that too many children are “missing out on the transformative benefits on outcomes that early intervention offers,” Ring said. “Earlier diagnosis has got to be a priority.”

biosolids land application sewage sludge

In a statement, Coleen Boyle, director of the CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, echoed the sentiment.

“Community leaders, health professionals, educators and childcare providers should use these data to ensure children with ASD are identified as early as possible and connected to the services they need,” she said.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/27/autism-rate-1-in-68_n_5041858.html

 

Alzheimer’s Disease Soaring In Finland, Iceland, United States

Alzheimer’s Disease Spreading Through Bodily Fluids

The deadly Alzheimer’s disease epidemic is real. It’s global. It’s unstoppable. More than 50 million people around the world are dying from the disease today. The numbers will continue to climb at a faster pace unless we identify and stop the environmental component of the disease (a contagion called a prion). Prions are a deadly and unstoppable form of protein that migrates, mutates, multiplies and kills with unparalleled efficiency.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion (PREE-on) disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is at the extreme end of the spectrum. Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we are facing a public health disaster because of the negligence.

prion disease spectrum

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions in their urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems and their by-products. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators and distributors. The sewage sludge and wastewater released are spreading disease far and wide. Sewage mismanagement also is contributing to the global surge in autism.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said.

joel pedersen prion research

“Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment.”

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

As the chart below illustrates, not all countries are experiencing the same prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease. The North Atlantic countries of Finland, Iceland and Sweden have some of the highest rates of dementia in the world. Why?

Why is Finland’s dementia rate 39 percent higher than Iceland’s? If dementia is a random or sporadic condition, there should be little or no variance in the incidence from country to country. In reality, the differences and coincidences are alarming.

The United States and other developed countries also have high incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, doctors are withholding millions of additional diagnoses in the United States, so we don’t know the extent of the epidemic in America, but the incidence likely rivals Finland.

The undeveloped countries across Asia, Africa and South America have the lowest incidence. What causes these regional variations? Could it be an unhealthy or contaminated diet in these countries? Could it be contaminated drinking water? Or is it another source of regional environmental contamination? We have our theories and we are backing them up with science and facts.

According to recent studies, Finland has the highest incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the world (current statistics here). Iceland and Sweden aren’t far behind. It could be that Finland is doing a better job of screening, diagnosing and offering honest assessments. What can we learn from these regional variations? What are the common threads that can help us unravel the causes of neurological disease?

Alzheimer’s/Dementia Deaths/100K
1.   Finland                     34.9
2.  Iceland                      25.1
3.  United States           24.8
4.  Sweden                     21.5
5.  Netherlands             21.4
6.  Switzerland              20.0
7.  Cuba                           19.6
8.  Chile                          19.6
9.  Andorra                     19.4
10.  Spain                        18.7
11.  Norway                     18.6
12.  Uruguay                   17.5
13.  Denmark                  17.4
14.  United Kingdom    17.1
15.  France                      16.6

Although there are many causes of Alzheimer’s and related neurological diseases, the Baltic Sea region is a microcosm worth studying. The Baltic Sea is one of the most polluted bodies of water on the planet. Much of the pollution originates upstream and on land, but tons of it are dumped directly in the sea.

We have our theories about the spread of the disease and why it may be higher in these regions. Prions earned the Nobel Prize for Dr. Stanley Prusiner in 1997. In humans, we know prion disease as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In other mammals, we know it as mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease, which has now jumped the Atlantic from North America to the reindeer in Norway. Sick deer didn’t cross the ocean to infect the reindeer.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

Sewage sludge dumped on land is the common denominator and Norway’s sewage is very infectious. The country has one of the highest incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the world. Prion disease has even been found in dolphins and it’s likely what is causing the massive die-offs and beaching of whales. It’s because of groundwater runoff from infected fields and forests.

These sick animals are canaries in the proverbial coal mine. If sewage is infecting wildlife, it’s happening to the livestock that produce our meat and dairy products. They just aren’t living long enough to exhibit the clinical symptoms and testing for mad cow disease, for example, isn’t happening in a meaningful manner. The same prion contamination is exposing every person on the planet to deadly neurological disease and other ailments. Our food and water supplies are being contaminated with infectious and toxic sewage. It’s time to outlaw this foolish practice that’s enriching corporations, such as Synagro, Lystek and others. It’s time to purge the institutional corruption within federal, state and local governments that enables this deadly practice.

The largest prion pathway in the world is human sewage and the dumping of it on farms, ranches, forests, playgrounds, golf courses, parks, forests, and beyond. This illegal dumping of infectious waste is reckless and it’s contributing to a public health disaster. Neurodegenerative disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. Sewage isn’t fuel, fertilizer or a safe source of drinking water. Unfortunately, it’s the source of deadly and unstoppable disease. It’s time to manage it responsibly.

Prions are contributing to the global spike in prion diseases, which also are known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). There is no species barrier to prion disease. A deadly prion is a deadly prion.

All forms of prion disease are deadly, incurable, contagious and unstoppable. Each species impacted is fueling the environmental contamination and cross-contaminating others and others species via infected bodily fluids and tissues. People, livestock and wildlife with these diseases not only are incurable, they are spreading the contagion throughout their day via blood, saliva, mucus, urine and feces.

wastewater treatment plant

Sick people are infecting cropland via biosolids and wastewater reuse (prions cannot be stopped by sewage processing–just ask the U.S. EPA and WEF). Infected croplands proceed to infect crops, deer, elk, cattle and anything else that grazes or eats the crop. Rainwater and irrigation wash those prions from the crops into creeks, rivers, ponds, lakes, and oceans.

In other words, the hot spots for Alzheimer’s disease should be analyzed for all of these vectors. What do these areas have in common regarding sewage, agriculture, fishing, water supplies, health systems and more? The vectors are expanding by the day and ignorance and denial will only make things worse. Once these diseases come nipping at your door, we may all wish that we had taken the prion epidemic much more seriously and did not spread them like fertilizer.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

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Yale Studying Proteins That Connect Alzheimer’s, Mad Cow Disease

Both Diseases In Family Of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies

Researchers at Yale University have completed a molecular model for Alzheimer’s disease by identifying a protein that plays a key role in its onset. The study showed that when the activity of this protein is blocked by an existing drug, mice engineered as models for human Alzheimer’s disease recover their memories.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is now at epidemic proportions in modern life, subjecting patients, families, and society to costs whose magnitude and nature are arguably unlike those of any other common disease. Often described as the progressive loss of self, more than 10 percent of those over 80 years in age are affected, a number expected to grow to about 100 million worldwide by 2050.

Alzheimer’s disease has been a part of the human condition as far back as historians can gaze, although it was only identified as a unique combination of symptoms in the early 1900s. It wasn’t such a major factor in everyday life in the past because life expectancy was much shorter, meaning people would tend to die prior to presenting with AD. For similar reasons, we have not evolved any very effective defense mechanisms against the advance of AD, either through evolution or through the progress of biology and medicine.

While some progress has been made, developing an Alzheimer’s disease treatment without a clear understanding of the disease is a hard row to hoe.

While there is as yet no generally accepted model for the cause or progression of AD, the two currently favored models both involve accumulation of abnormal proteins within the brain. The amyloid hypothesis suggests that accumulation of plaques made of a close relative of the beta-amyloid protein within the brain disrupts communication between neurons.

This hypothesis includes a receptor that binds these plaques to the prion protein, which is connected with mad cow disease (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.) However, lost function does not return when the plaques are simply removed from nervous tissue (e.g. by the immune system as stimulated by a vaccine), so they cannot be the whole story.

Tau proteins help stabilize the microtubules within the neurons of the brain against mechanical and chemical damage. The tau hypothesis for AD states that the tau protein can enter a state known as hyperphosphilation, in which the protein has acquired the maximum possible amount of phosphorous. At that point, they begin to spontaneously self-assemble into tangles of helical and straight filaments. Such tangles damage the structure of the neuron in which they form, diminish the functionality of individual neurons, and eventually destroy the cells themselves. Another potential difficulty associated with tau protein is that, if misfolded, it can lead to insoluble deposits which also damage the ability of the neurons to function. This again appears to link to the known prion diseases of the brain.

Alzheimer's disease research

Yale professor Stephen Strittmatter’s group, in an earlier study of the amyloid hypothesis, has shown that short segments of beta amyloid link up with prion proteins that reside on the cell membranes of the brain’s neurons. In some then unknown manner, the linking of the amyloid and the prion protein led to the activation of Fyn, a signaling protein in cellular metabolism. In the end, this activation leads to the loss of synapses and tau protein tangles characteristic of AD.

In the most recent study (published in the medical journal Neuron) the Yale team reports the discovery that the activation of Fyn takes place through the mediation of a protein within the cell membrane, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Antagonists and modulators of this receptor are known to have mood-leveling effects, and have been under investigation for use in patients with Fragile X syndrome, a genetic form of autism.

When such an antagonist drug was given to mice with AD-like brain damage, the ability of the mice to remember the past and set new memories for future access was restored. Inhibition of the mGluR5 signaling path proved far more effective in treating the underlying condition of the mice than did previous attempts to simply remove the plaques.

“What is very exciting is that of all the links in this molecular chain, this is the protein that may be most easily targeted by drugs,” said Stephen Strittmatter, the Vincent Coates Professor of Neurology and senior author of the study. “This gives us strong hope that we can find a drug that will work to lessen the burden of Alzheimer’s disease.”

There remains a great deal of work to carry out, first to discover if similar treatments will have analogous effectiveness on human AD patients, then to discover if such drugs are sufficiently safe for use in elderly patients. It is also not yet clear what level of damage might be reversed by mGluR5 antagonist treatment.

Even an extra year of mental clarity would no doubt be a great gift to those afflicted by Alzheimer’s disease.

Source: http://news.yale.edu/2013/09/04/alzheimer-s-missing-link-found-promising-target-new-drugs

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