Burden Of Care For Alzheimer’s Disease Rising Fast

Neurodegenerative Disease The Fastest-Growing Cause Of Death

Someone in the world develops dementia every three seconds. There were an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide living with dementia diagnoses in 2015 and this number is believed to be close to 50 million people in 2017. This number will almost double every 20 years, reaching 75 million in 2030 and 131.5 million in 2050. The X factor is the number of people who have dementia, but have not been diagnosed. It’s estimated that the real number is drastically higher.

Much of the increase will be in developing countries. Already 58 percent of people with dementia live in low and middle income countries, but by 2050 this will rise to 68 percent.

The total estimated worldwide cost of dementia is US$818 billion in 2015, which represents 1.09 percent of global GDP. By 2018, the global cost of dementia will rise above a US$1 trillion.

This figure includes costs attributed to informal care (unpaid care provided by family and others), direct costs of social care (provided by community care professionals, and in residential home settings) and the direct costs of medical care (the costs of treating dementia and other conditions in primary and secondary care).

In the U.S. alone, it’s estimated that Alzheimer’s disease is already costing citizens $277 billion annually, including $186 billion in Medicare and Medicaid payments. 

Between 2000 and 2015, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease as recorded on death certificates increased 123 percent, while deaths from the number one cause of death (heart disease) decreased 11 percent. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease isn’t always diagnosed and it isn’t accurately reported as the cause of death in the majority of cases. Eighty-three percent of the help provided to older adults in the United States comes from family members, friends or other unpaid caregivers. Nearly half of all caregivers who provide help to older adults do so for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.

Alzheimers disease epidemic

Direct medical care costs account for roughly 20 percent of global dementia costs, while direct social sector costs and informal care costs each account for roughly 40 percent. The relative contribution of informal care is greatest in the African regions and lowest in North America, Western Europe and some South American regions, while the reverse is true for social sector costs.

This means that if global dementia care were a country, it would be the 18th largest economy in the world. The annual costs exceed the market values of companies such as Apple (US $742 billion) and Google (US $368 billion).

Research shows that most people currently living with dementia have not received a formal diagnosis. In high income countries, only 20-50 percent of dementia cases are recognised and documented in primary care. This ‘treatment gap’ is certainly much greater in low and middle income countries, with one study in India suggesting 90 percent remain undiagnosed. If these statistics are extrapolated to other countries worldwide, it suggests that approximately three quarters of people with dementia have not received a diagnosis, and therefore do not have access to treatment, care and organized support that getting a formal diagnosis can provide.

Earlier diagnosis and early intervention are important mechanisms by which the treatment gap can be closed. Among all people alive today, if those who will get Alzheimer’s disease were diagnosed when they had mild cognitive impairment (MCI) — before dementia — it would save trillions of dollars in health and long-term care costs.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

Answers To Alzheimer’s Begin With The Truth

President Ronald Reagan designated November as National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month in 1983. At the time, fewer than 2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s; today, the number of people diagnosed (and still alive) with the disease has soared to nearly 5.4 million. The X factor is the millions who are going undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

Mayors in cities around the nation are declaring November Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness and Caregivers Month.

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth-leading cause, and the fastest-growing cause, of death in the United States (and the world), which has some of the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the world. Finland, Sweden and Iceland also are at the top of the list. However, states such as Washington, North Dakota and South Dakota rival the rates found in Scandinavian countries.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease is going undiagnosed and misdiagnosed at an escalating pace. Many people, for example, have had diagnoses withheld by their doctors. The epidemic is more widespread than anyone knows. Physicians have withheld millions of diagnoses from patients and their families. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physicians in the U.S. only inform 45 percent of patients about their Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The same suppression is likely at work in most countries. Meanwhile, millions more go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

A groundbreaking study suggested that Alzheimer’s disease causes six times as many deaths as the official statistics would indicate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that, in 2010, Alzheimer’s caused almost 84,000 deaths in the United States, a number derived from death certificates in which Alzheimer’s disease was listed as the main cause. But, in reality, the study said Alzheimer’s was the underlying cause in more than 500,000 deaths in 2010 that were often attributed to conditions, such as pneumonia, caused by complications of Alzheimer’s. Those numbers make Alzheimer’s disease the third-leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer. The study was led by researchers at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and published in 2013 in the medical journal Neurology.

Meanwhile, no one is talking about the fact that most forms of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, is transmissible. Spouses of those with Alzheimer’s disease, for example, are 600 percent more likely to contract the disease. Other caregivers also are in harm’s way. In fact, entire communities are at risk of exposure.

prion disease spectrum

According to neuroscientists Dr. Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones but it has not been declared a reportable disease in the U.S. and many other nations. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The disease is now striking young people, including teenagers, with much greater frequency. It’s also killing clusters of people in the same communities with greater frequency.

It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. Informed neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risk of transmission. They are making diagnoses from across the room.

“Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

On average, Alzheimer’s follows a 14-year course from onset of symptoms until death. For most patients, symptoms go undiagnosed and untreated for at least seven years. For most patients, symptoms go undiagnosed and untreated for at least seven years, during which time the lesions spread through the brain and cause irreparable damage, said Dennis Fortier, author of the Brain Today blog.

 

“With a good diet, physical exercise, social engagement, and certain drugs, many patients (especially those detected at an early stage) can meaningfully alter the course of Alzheimer’s and preserve their quality of life,” Fortier said. “No cure does not mean that there is no treatment.”

The health of the brain is affected by our overall health. Research shows that high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and obesity increase the risk for cognitive decline. A healthy brain requires strong blood flow and plenty of oxygen.

Meanwhile, we can’t forget that:

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Spouses of those with Alzheimer’s disease are 600% more likely to contract the disease, which is further evidence that it is a transmissible disease. Caregivers, family members and others are in harm’s way because of disease mismanagement and misinformation;
  • People in Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease. Rates in North Dakota, South Dakota and Washington rival the highest rates in the world. Sewage mismanagement and the mismanagement of other forms of infectious waste are responsible for much of the epidemic in these regions and beyond;

We can’t ignore that the global Alzheimer’s disease epidemic and the autism epidemic both began to rise in the late 1970s. They proceeded to spike dramatically in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The spikes in autism and Alzheimer’s disease are almost identical in terms of timing and trajectory. The surge in chronic wasting disease among deer also follows the same trend. These devastating diseases are symptoms of a much bigger problem associated with toxic and infectious waste. Industry policies and practices changed dramatically, which triggered an explosion in brain disease.

According to a 2010 study by the Centers for Disease Control, Utah, North Carolina and New Jersey have the highest rates of autism. ASD strikes one in every 32 Utah boys, and one in every 85 girls. In New Jersey, one in every 28 boys has ASD. The numbers are likely still rising.

Thanks to modern sewage disposal and antiquated risk assessments, we’re witnessing a public health disaster that’s still unfolding in the form of autism, Alzheimer’s disease, west Nile virus, Zika virus, chronic wasting disease, valley fever, meningitis, hepatitis, and other threats to public health.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Read more about the autism epidemic and its connection to infectious proteins and other neurotoxins that are spreading through biosolids and wastewater reclamation. Please contact us to share your insights, opinions and support for critical reforms.

Alzheimer's disease public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise.

 

Patients With Neurodegenerative Disease Produce Infectious Waste

Caregivers Caught In The Crossfire Of Misinformation, Mismanagement

Neurodegenerative disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. Alzheimer’s disease alone is taking the lives of 50-100 million people now. Despite millions of Alzheimer’s-related fatalities annually, experts suggest that the prevalence of the disease among the living will quadruple by 2050, if not sooner. Some advocates are warning that the surging epidemic could bankrupt entire nations.

Unfortunately, there is a growing stack of evidence that Alzheimer’s disease is a transmissible disease, which means that millions of caregivers, friends and family members are at risk.

The epidemic is more widespread than anyone knows. A groundbreaking study suggested that Alzheimer’s disease causes six times as many deaths than official statistics indicate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that, in 2010, Alzheimer’s disease caused almost 84,000 deaths in the United States, a number derived from death certificates in which Alzheimer’s disease was listed as the main cause. In reality, the study said Alzheimer’s disease was the underlying cause in more than 500,000 deaths in 2010 that were often attributed to conditions, such as pneumonia, caused by complications of Alzheimer’s. Those numbers make Alzheimer’s disease the third-leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer. The study was led by researchers at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and published in 2013 in the medical journal Neurology.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing prions (PREE-ons) and prion disease, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Prions are a deadly and unstoppable form of protein that migrates, mutates, multiplies and kills with unparalleled efficiency.

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. Unfortunately, Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we all are facing a public health disaster because of the negligence and reckless disregard for public health. Misinformed caregivers, family members, healthcare workers and others are caught in the crossfire of a deadly contagion known as a prion.

TSE is a spectrum disease also known as prion disease. The spectrum includes Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and an extremely aggressive version known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Prusiner claims that all forms of TSE are caused by infectious prions. The prion spectrum varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. When the presenting symptom is memory loss, the diagnoses flow along the following chart.

prion disease spectrum

It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. Informed neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risk of transmission. They are making diagnoses from across the room.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

According to neuroscientists Dr. Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones but it has not been declared a reportable disease in the U.S. and many other nations. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The disease is now striking young people, including teenagers, with much greater frequency. It’s also killing clusters of people in the same communities with greater frequency. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them because infectious prions are in the urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva of each victim. These infectious bodily fluids are contributing to the rapid spread of Alzheimer’s and other mutations of prion disease.

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Caregivers and other stakeholders are caught in the crossfire of misinformation and mismanagement. At the most basic level, this means that a sneeze, a drinking glass and eating utensils are permanent pathways of disease transmission. Anything that ever comes into contact with the bodily fluids of a victim is impossible to sterilize.

Alzheimer's disease diagnosis

On a larger level, it means that entire communities and watersheds are at risk of permanent contamination from just a single victim, not to mention thousands of infectious victims. Alzheimer’s disease is an environmental nightmare–it’s a real-world version of Pandora’s box.

A study published in the journal Nature adds to the evidence about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the claim. Meanwhile, there is absolutely no evidence to contrary. Even wildlife are contracting brain disease from people because of the dumping of infectious waste on farms, ranches and forests.

Caregivers are being misinformed about the risks associated with exposure to people with Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. 

Surgical instruments infected with prions, for example, are impossible to sterilize. Hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for prions or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

Wastewater treatment plants are collecting points for prions from infected humans. The sewage treatment process can’t stop prions from migrating, mutating and multiplying before being discharged into the environment where they can kill again. Wastewater treatment plants are spreading infectious waste far and wide because they are incapable of stopping prions. As such, all by-products and discharges from wastewater treatment plants are infectious waste, which are contributing to the global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among humans, wildlife and livestock.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, the EPA’s risk assessment on sewage sludge and biosolids were prepared before the world of science knew about prions. The agency continues to cling to it’s antiquated sludge rule crafted back in the dark ages. It does, however, consider prions a “emerging contaminant of concern.” Meanwhile, its outdated risk assessments are promoting a public health disaster. The neurotoxins found in sewage, including heavy metals, also are contributing to the global spike in autism, which follows the same timing and trajectory as the spike in neurodegenerative diseases.

wastewater treatment plant

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies, wildlife, livestock, sea mammals and humans. According to prion researcher Joel Pedersen at the University of Wisconsin, prions in soil become up to 680 times more infectious. From there, they migrate, mutate and multiply. It’s a real world version of Pandora’s Lunchbox.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Answers begin with the truth.

Alzheimer's disease public relations firm

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Neurodegenerative Disease A Global Epidemic

Neurodegenerative Disease The Fastest Growing Cause Of Death

Death rates from heart disease and cancer are dropping globally due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management. Meanwhile, neurodegenerative disease is exploding because it’s highly contagious in most cases.

In the U.S., deaths from Alzheimer’s disease increased 71 percent from 2000 to 2013, while those attributed to heart disease decreased 14 percent. Similar trends are emerging around the world. Unfortunately, the global spike in autism shares the same timing and trajectory as the surge in neurodegenerative disease. It’s not just a coincidence. The correlation is real thanks to reckless policies and practices. It appears that the biggest difference between autism and classic forms of neurodegenerative disease is age of onset.

The actual epidemic is larger than anyone knows. Physicians are withholding millions of diagnoses from patients and their families. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physicians in the U.S. only inform 45 percent of patients about their Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. The same suppression is likely at work in most countries. Meanwhile, millions more go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Women face an elevated risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing prions (PREE-ons) and prion disease, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Prions are a deadly and unstoppable form of protein that migrates, mutates, multiplies and kills with unparalleled efficiency.

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. Unfortunately, Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we all are facing a public health disaster because of the negligence and reckless disregard for public health.

TSE is a spectrum disease also known as prion disease. The spectrum includes Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and an extremely aggressive version known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Prusiner claims that all forms of TSE are caused by infectious prions. The prion spectrum varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. When the presenting symptom is memory loss, the diagnoses flow along the following chart.

prion disease spectrum

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. The most savvy neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risk of infection. They are making diagnoses from across the room. Unfortunately, caregivers aren’t warned accordingly.

“CJD behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

According to neuroscientist Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

Prions are now the X factor and they are not being accounted for by industry or government. Prions are an infectious form of glycoprotein that can spread throughout the body.

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A recent study published in the journal Nature also renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence. There is no evidence that Alzheimer’s disease is not infectious to other mammals.

Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions because prions are in the urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva of each victim.

Alzheimer's disease infectious disease

Not only are homes, hospitals and nursing homes exposed to the deadly prion pathogen from those with prion disease, so are entire sewage treatment systems and their by-products. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators and distributors. The sewage sludge and wastewater released are spreading disease far and wide. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues confirmed the presence of prions in urine.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said.

joel pedersen prion research

“Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. It’s reported that prions released from people are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

Sewage from hospitals, nursing homes, slaughterhouses, morgues, mortuaries, veterinarians and other high-risk places enters the same sewage system. Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, sewage systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Wastewater treatment systems are now prion incubators and distributors.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, the EPA’s risk assessment on sewage sludge and biosolids were prepared before the world of science knew about prions. The agency continues to cling to it’s antiquated sludge rule crafted back in the dark ages. It does, however, consider prions a “emerging contaminant of concern.” Meanwhile, its outdated risk assessments are promoting a public health disaster.

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Researchers have more questions than answers about brain disease, but we know that neurotoxins, head trauma and genetics can all trigger neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately, that’s where our knowledge gets fuzzy.

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease. TSEs also have the potential of being transmitted from humans to animals. The most common example is chronic wasting disease among deer species. Deer, elk, moose, reindeer and many other animals are being exposed to infectious waste in sewage.

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Wastewater treatment doesn’t touch prions. In fact, these facilities are now helping incubate and distribute prions via solids and wastewater released.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more. Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

Prions shed from humans are the most deadly. They demand more respect than radiation. They’re being ignored by regulators and industry alike. As such, food and water sources are being contaminated with the deadliest forms of prions. Homes, nursing homes, hospitals, clinics and restaurants are other examples of public places that are being contaminated by prions from victims of prion disease.

The deadly prion spectrum also includes mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease among deer. Scientists have shown that infected tissues can transmit prion disease between animals. There is no species barrier.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

wastewater treatment plant

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop deadly prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. Dumping sewage sludge (biosolids) from billions of people on land and at sea spreads prions far and wide. It also spreads heavy metals, radioactive waste, carcinogens, pharmaceuticals and more. It’s time for the truth. It’s time for reforms that can safeguard us from this public health disaster.

Read more about the correlation between Alzheimer’s disease, autism and sewage mismanagement. http://alzheimerdisease.tv/autism/

autism population

Background On Sewage Sludge

In 1972, world leaders admitted that dumping highly toxic sewage sludge into the oceans killed entire underwater ecosystems and threatened public health. Some nations stopped the dumping immediately and started dumping it on land or burning it in incinerators. The most responsible cities started putting sewage sludge in landfills. Meanwhile, the United States allowed cities to keep dumping sewage sludge at sea for another 20 years. It finally passed the Ocean Dumping Ban Act of 1988, when beaches along the east coast were forced to close because of high levels of pathogens from sewage that washed up on shore.

land application sewage sludge and disease

The law prohibited all dumping of industrial waste and municipal sewage sludge into our oceans after December 31, 1991. It did nothing however, to keep cities such as Boston and Los Angeles from dumping millions of gallons of raw sewage directly into the oceans every day, but with the help of the U.S. EPA, the Act did redirect millions of tons of deadly toxins and pathogens from our oceans to farms, ranches, national forests, city parks, golf courses, playgrounds, fair grounds, race tracks, sport fields and beyond. From there, the pathogens began contaminating food, water and air as they were soaked up by crops, swept away by rainwater and picked up by windstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes and dumped on innocent citizens where they live, work and play. The runoff still contaminates our oceans after it filters through our creeks, lakes and rivers.

After the 1991 ban on ocean dumping, the EPA instituted a policy of sewage sludge reuse on agricultural land. It hired a PR firm to spin a new brand for the death dirt. They crafted the clever name “biosolids” to help disguise the hazards. The EPA promoted biosolids recycling throughout the 1990s. Unfortunately, the risk assessments were severely biased and flawed. The proof is in the pudding.

This new form of sewage dispersal has sparked a public health disaster that’s still unfolding in the form of autism, Alzheimer’s disease, west Nile virus, Zika virus, chronic wasting disease, meningitis, hepatitis, and other threats to public health. The risk assessments for these practices failed to account for heavy metals, pharmaceutical residue, radionuclides, carcinogens and a deadly form of protein known as a prion (which was unknown to the world of science at the time). The practice sparked a public health disaster in exchange for healthier oceans and a very profitable new industry. The EPA even took its show on the road and convinced other nations to use its faulty risk assessments to justify multi-million dollar contracts for these new corporations. Countries such as Canada took the bait hook, line and sinker and never conducted its own risk assessments.

Chronic wasting disease is now rampant among deer and elk in Canada and it recently jumped the Atlantic to Norway’s reindeer herd. It’s spreading across the U.S. like wildfire as we spread more pathogens and lies. Land application sites often involve locations where poverty is high and economic prosperity is low, which means resistance is low. Sludge tends to be dumped where minorities live, leading to allegations of environmental racism. Unfortunately, contaminated food and water make it back to the cities where the infectious waste originated.

Treated sewage sludge has been used in the UK, Europe and China agriculturally for more than 80 years, though there is increasing pressure in some countries to stop the practice of land application due to farm land contamination and public outrage. In the 1990s there was pressure in some European countries to ban the use of sewage sludge as a fertilizer. Switzerland, Sweden, Austria, and others introduced a ban to safeguard public health. Others should follow their example.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

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public relations firm Alzheimer's disease

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Call 602-999-7204 or write to Gary Chandler to join our campaign and coalition for truth and reform. gary@crossbow1.com. Together, we can prevent Alzheimer’s disease and autism.

Microcephaly Adds To Global Surge In Brain Disease

Microcephaly, Zika Virus Fueled By Sewage

Brain disease is consuming record numbers of people around the world right now. Microcephaly in infants is just the latest example.

Microcephaly is a nonspecific term used to describe a small head circumference, and can be caused by maternal exposure to a variety of pathogens and toxins, including HIV, alcohol, radiation, or TORCH pathogens (Toxoplasma gondii, other, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus). It is therefore important that radiologists know what to look for when it comes to Zika.

The global epidemic is being fueled by infectious waste that’s contaminating food, water, air and more. This infectious waste (from people with infectious brain disease) contains deadly and unstoppable neurotoxins, but it’s being spread like fertilizer in virtually every country around the world (if not just dumped openly). The fight against mosquitoes is part of the battle now, but it will miss the war against the source–infectious waste.

microcephaly and Zika virus

Zika virus is an emerging flavivirus initially described in 1947. The first outbreak of Zika virus occurred in 2007 in the Pacific and the virus has spread in this region since 2013, and in the Americas since 2015. Concomitantly, severe neurological complications in adults, fetuses, and neonates have been described. Zika virus is mainly mosquito borne, but non-vector transmission (maternal–fetal, sexual, and blood transfusion) is possible, with an unknown effect on the burden of the disease. Drinking contaminated water also is a growing source. So are foods infected with this contaminated water.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes are not the only pathway from infectious waste to you. Contaminated food, drinking water and the air that we breathe are just as dangerous.

raw sewage and water contamination

Microcephaly, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease and other neurodegenerative (brain) diseases are now spread by infectious medical wastes. 

To stop the global epidemic of brain disease, we must stop throwing fuel on the fire. Sewage mismanagement is contaminating food, water and air around the world. It’s spreading infectious waste and infectious diseases. Microcephaly is just the latest symptom of the global problem. Thanks to reckless policies, extreme weather now fans the flames. Tornadoes, floods, droughts and rising tides are pushing tons of sewage further into the lives of everyone. It’s a perfect storm.

biosolids land application contaminates food water

The planet has a record human population competing for limited space and resources. We are producing record volumes of sewage, which includes much more than the obvious. Sewage is now the most toxic, unregulated waste stream in the world. It’s become a deadly cocktail of carcinogens, radionuclides, nerve agents, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors and deadly prions—the deadly pathogen responsible for a spectrum of brain diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE).

The most common forms of TSE include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all forms of prion disease. TSEs also include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease and many others. It’s also killing sea mammals as oceans around the world continue filling with tons of sewage every day. There is no species barrier to prion disease or toxic exposure.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

The global surge in neurodegenerative disease among people, wildlife and livestock has been in motion for about 25 years thanks to the reckless dumping of sewage and the land application of sewage sludge as a fertilizer. The epidemic is reaching critical mass as neurodegenerative disease is now consuming the brains of the unborn–not just the aged.

microcephaly epidemic

Unfortunately, we are disposing of record quantities of sewage openly in the streets and rivers. We’re dumping tons of it on pastures, farms, parks, golf courses, sporting fields, forests and beyond. This infectious waste runs off into our water supplies. It’s picked up by the wind and carried to points unknown. Reckless practices, such as the land application of sewage sludge, have opened Pandora’s box. It’s causing irreversible, deadly contamination around the world.

Unfortunately, public servants are deliberately sweeping sewage-related risks under the rug. The risk assessments for the land application of sewage sludge, for example, are fraudulent. They were deliberately skewed to overlook proven public health risks, including airborne pathways. Bending the rules with bad science allowed for the creation of a multi-billion dollar industry and a toxic by-product called biosolids. It’s still deadly sewage sludge.

So-called regulators are overlooking deadly and unstoppable prions in sewage. As such, most sewage dumping and wastewater reclamation practices are illegal and should be stopped immediately. Safer alternatives exist.

sewage treatment and Zika virus

Thanks to this fraud, infectious sewage is being dumped openly in our watersheds and directly on crops. The prion pathogen in sewage, for example, migrates, mutates and multiplies. Prions shed from humans are the most aggressive and deadly. Prions demand more respect than radiation because they don’t deplete in the environment. Plus, each victim becomes a prion incubator and distributor. Prions should be locked away and contained. Not openly distributed and consumed by an unsuspecting public.

As warm weather approaches in the northern hemisphere, mosquitoes are awakening, breeding, biting and spreading sewage-borne diseases again. Reckless sewage dumping is creating a public health disaster. The dynamics associated with climate change are compounding the problems of sewage management. Mosquitoes have more fuel than ever. So does the wind and our water. It’s time to stop the mismanagement and misinformation. The stakes have never been higher.

infected water and disease

Please join our global coalition of Homeland Defenders. Join our campaign for truth and reform. Please write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Read More At http://crossbowcommunications.com/land-application-of-sewage-sludge-spreading-brain-disease/

Prevent, Treat Alzheimer’s Disease With Smart Nutrition

Nutrition Delivers Effective Compounds To Brain

Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and other forms of brain disease are the fastest-growing causes of death in the world. Most forms of brain disease are preventable, transmissible and treatable with targeted nutrition. That’s the theme for a new book that shines light on the global epidemic of brain disease.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

According to Gary Chandler, author of Beat Brain Disease With Smart Food, Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now. Millions more will contract the disease this year, while just as many will go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

Death rates from heart disease and cancer are dropping in most countries due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management. Meanwhile, neurodegenerative disease is spreading exponentially. In the U.S., deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 71 percent from 2000 to 2013, while those attributed to heart disease decreased 14 percent. Experts suggest that the prevalence of brain disease will quadruple by 2050, if not sooner.

“Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,” said Chandler. “Many industry practices are based upon a faulty risk assessment.”

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Caregivers (spouses) are six times more likely to contract brain disease (most caregivers are women); and
  • People in Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

infectious waste and food contamination

Sewage sludge, biosolids, and reclaimed wastewater are recycling prions from victims into our food and water supplies. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds. Avoiding prions in your food and water is a critical step in wellness. Unfortunately, it’s easier said than done.

Some foods increase your risk of contracting brain disease, while some foods help prevent it. Other foods offer the best hope for effective treatment. Most drugs offer no help at all. Drug companies are making billions selling placebos. Targeted nutrition is our best hope for prevention and treatment.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Preview and order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

Learn more about treating Alzheimer’s disease http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-treatment/

Brain Disease The Fastest Growing Cause Of Death

More Than 50 Million People Have Alzheimer’s Disease

Neurodegenerative disease is now a global epidemic among many mammals, including humans. Advocates claim that mismanagement and misinformation around the world are fanning the flames and putting millions of people in harm’s way.

Anywhere from 50-100 million people around the world are dying of brain disease. Millions more will contract it this year, while just as many will go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Adding to the madness is the fact that physicians are withholding millions of other diagnoses.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Death rates from heart disease, cancer and other leading causes of death are steady, if not dropping, in most countries due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management. Unfortunately, neurodegenerative disease is the one glaring exception. It’s spreading exponentially. If we had accurate mortality statistics, we would likely find that brain disease is already the leading cause of death around the world. Some countries are at a higher risk than others.

“This will be the most important documentary ever produced about brain disease,” said Gary Chandler, president of Crossbow Communications. “Thanks to mismanagement and the widespread contamination of our food and water, brain disease has more to do with neurotoxins than it does with normal aging and genetics.”

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. In fact, they migrate, mutate and multiply.

Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems and their by-products. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. The sewage sludge and wastewater released are spreading disease far and wide.

Alzheimer's disease prevention and treatment

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Dumping sewage sludge (biosolids) from billions of people on land and at sea spreads prions far and wide. It also spreads heavy metals, radioactive waste, carcinogens, pharmaceuticals and more. The risk assessments for biosolids and wastewater reuse don’t mention prions because there is no answer.

“Although there are many factors contributing to the global epidemic, millions of these deaths could have been prevented,” said Chandler. “In addition to dietary risks, it appears that Alzheimer’s disease is just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. There’s no evidence to the contrary.”

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Caregivers are six times more likely to contract brain disease;
  • People from Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest death rates from Alzheimer’s; and
  • Smart nutrition is the best strategy to avoid brain disease and the only way to effectively treat its symptoms.

biosolids land application sewage sludge

There are many more questions than answers, but we know that neurotoxins, head trauma and genetics can all trigger neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately, that’s where much of the knowledge gets fuzzy. Diagnoses, for example, are barely more than a shot in the dark.

According to Chandler, truth and targeted nutrition are the best defense against environmental contamination and brain disease. His company is producing a documentary that will help promote food safety, wellness and reform. It’s called “Food For Thought.” It offers the most comprehensive guidance available about prevention, aversion and treatment, including vital advice for caregivers and family members.

brain disease treatment

Preview and order the eBook now. It will:

  • Help you avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Offer targeted nutritional guidance that can save lives;
  • Offer nutritional therapies that can make a difference. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutrition for neurological disease available. It also has critical aversion strategies;
  • Inform caregivers about misinformation and misdiagnoses that put them in harm’s way;
  • Blow the whistle on industry practices that are contaminating food, water and other pathways; and
  • Advocate for food safety, water quality, wellness and reforms that can save millions of lives.

According to Chandler, pharmaceutical remedies are nonexistent, but nutritional strategies and tactics provide hope and relief from many symptoms. Unfortunately, there is no cure for brain disease, so prevention is paramount.

The film will be produced in both Denver and Phoenix. The producers are looking for testimonials and commentary from a variety of stakeholders, including family, caregivers, providers and advocates. For more information, please contact Gary Chandler at 602-999-7204 or visit our home page at http://alzheimerdisease.tv/

Crossbow Communications is a public affairs and issue-management firm headquartered in Denver, Colorado. The company is expanding to Phoenix, Arizona. The firm specializes in health and environmental issues. It has helped influence public opinion and public policy around the world. For more information, please visit http://crossbowcommunications.com/phoenix-pr-firm-alzheimers-disease/

Documentary Will Shine Light On Neurodegenerative Disease

Sponsors, Investors Can Build Bottom Line, Better World

The Alzheimers disease epidemic has become an environmental nightmare. A new documentary hopes to turn the tide.

Help us expose the misinformation and mismanagement that is fueling the global epidemic that is killing 50 million people around the world right now. Several factors are fueling the surge in neurodegenerative disease. The truth is our only hope. Prevention is the only defense.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Several forms of neurodegenerative disease are contagious. That’s why caregivers are 600% more likely to contract Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s or the feared Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Doctors can’t distinguish between these diseases and they can’t confirm a diagnosis without an autopsy. Compounding the problem is the fact that doctors are withholding “diagnoses” from millions of people, which protects insurance companies, but not families.

That’s right, Alzheimer’s has become an industrial disease. Industry practices are contributing to it and industrial practices are trying to cover it up. The good news is that the truth can help you navigate this toxic minefield and the lies that are covering it up. Our documentary also will empower you with information that can help you refine your lifestyle to help avoid neurodegenerative disease.

biosolids management

biosolids land application contaminates food water

The script is complete. It’s powerful. I have refined my lifestyle, diet and supplements based on information that I have uncovered in just the last eight weeks.

As Wall Street is tanking, this is a chance to invest in a growth industry.Please read the update prior to this one about my offer to investors. More than 200 million people around the world need this information today just to help them manage neurodegenerative disease within their family. This documentary will be available to them online and on-demand for $10 or less. This is a chance to change the world and change lives before the problem escalates even further.

SPONSORS: If you have executive level contacts within corporations and advocacy organizations, please share this information with them and we will pay you a generous commission. Again, time is of the essence. I need your help.

Alzheimer's disease preventionThis multi-media platform can help sponsors build relationships, market share and the bottom line around the topic of Alzheimer’s disease. It’s a massive, growing market.

Ideal sponsors are in:
– Healthcare
– Health Insurance
– Food (products, retailers, restaurants, associations)
– Fitness
– Supplements
– Water Purification
– Assisted Living
– Wellness
– Many more…

gary chandler

For more information, please contact me at gary@crossbow1.com. To learn more about my company, please visit http://crossbowcommunications.com/public-affairs-firm-phoenix/ Thanks, my friends. We can do it together!

More Evidence That Parkinson’s A Transmissible Disease

Parkinson’s Disease Spreads With Help From Proteins

In Parkinson’s disease, the protein alpha-synuclein aggregates within neurons of patients and appears to propagate across interconnected areas of the brain. How this happens remains largely unknown. It has been proposed that alpha-synuclein may behave like a prion–a pathological form of protein capable of changing the conformation of normal alpha-synuclein and thus triggering its aggregation (clumps or plaques) and spread from neuron-to-neuron.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

“The (human) brain diseases caused by prions include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), and other disorders known as frontotemporal dementias,” said Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner, who earned a Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1997 for discovering deadly prions.

Prions are a deadly and unstoppable form of protein associated with a family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible.

According to research from John Hopkins, Duke University, and Utah State University, caregivers of someone with neurodegenerative disease are six times more likely to develop the condition themselves. Neurodegenerative disease is a spectrum disease. Some of the diseases on this spectrum are clearly infectious, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), the most severe form of prion disease in humans. It appears that Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease are just as transmissible as CJD. Mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease (deer) also are transmissible.

Abundant evidence underscores a critical role of the protein alpha-synuclein in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. In particular, alpha-synuclein is a major component of the intraneuronal inclusions, named Lewy bodies, that are progressively accumulated in the brains of patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Alpha-synuclein pathology often starts in a region of the lower brain called medulla oblongata from where it spreads upwardly toward midbrain and cortical areas. In the current study, sponsored in part by the Paul Foundation, DZNE researchers mimicked this phenomenon in mice. With the aid of a tailor-made viral vector, they transferred the blueprint of the human alpha-synuclein gene specifically into neurons in the mouse medulla oblongata. These cells then began producing and accumulating relatively large amounts of the exogenous (human) alpha-synuclein.

Using specific antibodies that recognize human alpha-synuclein, Di Monte and his colleagues tracked the spreading of this protein throughout the mouse brain over a period of 6 to 12 weeks. They also compared spreading and pathology in normal mice, which expressed both exogenous (human) and endogenous alpha-synuclein, versus mutant mice lacking their endogenous protein.

Alzheimer's disease research

In both groups of animals, increased expression of human alpha-synuclein resulted in its progressive diffusion from the medulla oblongata toward more rostral brain regions. This protein spreading involved at least one trans-synaptic jump and followed a stereotypical pattern consistent with diffusion via anatomically interconnected pathways. Furthermore, accumulation of the spreading protein within recipient neurons was accompanied by evidence of neuronal damage.

A prion-like seeding mechanism would predict that spreading of alpha-synuclein should be facilitated by interactions between abnormal forms of the protein generated within donor neurons and “uncorrupted” alpha-synuclein expressed within recipient cells. “In other words,” says Di Monte “we were expecting less efficient protein transmission and less pronounced pathology in mutant mice lacking endogenous alpha-synuclein. We were also expecting spreading and pathology to be associated with the accumulation of amyloidogenic alpha-synuclein; these are forms of the protein capable of producing insoluble fibrous aggregates.”

Contrary to these predictions, spreading of alpha-synuclein was enhanced rather than being counteracted by ablation of the endogenous protein in mutant mice. Furthermore, trans-neuronal passage of non-fibrillar alpha-synuclein species was responsible for protein diffusion and triggered neuronal pathology. The researcher explains, “We believe that these findings bear a number of important implications for disease pathogenesis. Not only can we conclude that long-distance diffusion of alpha-synuclein does not necessarily require the generation of prion-like species. Our data also reveal that spreading and pathology can be triggered by simple overexpression of the protein and are mediated, at least initially, by monomeric and/or oligomeric alpha-synuclein.”

The possibility that alpha-synuclein may behave like a prion has raised the speculation that, similar to some prion diseases (for example, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease), cases of Parkinson’s disease may arise from exposure to contagious protein species.

Di Monte stresses: “There is absolutely no indication that Parkinson’s could be a contagious disease. In fact, an important contribution of our new study is that it emphasizes how critical aspects of Parkinson’s disease pathogenesis, such as neuron-to-neuron alpha-synuclein transmission and protein aggregation, can be explained by mechanisms that are not prion-like.”

Di Monte and his colleagues at the DZNE intend to continue working on alpha-synuclein and are particularly interested in elucidating how alpha-synuclein could be targeted to slow down or halt the pathologic and clinical progression of the disease.

Prion Disease News via http://www.sciencecodex.com/parkinsons_disease_new_insights_into_a_traveling_protein-172730

Nutrition Treats Alzheimer’s Disease Better Than Drugs

Only Six Drugs Approved To Treat Symptoms Of Alzheimer’s Disease

There are no cures for Alzheimer’s and similar forms of neurodegenerative disease. There are few effective treatments to alleviate the symptoms for Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

The good news is that there are several super foods that can help us avert Alzheimer’s disease in the first place. Other super foods effectively treat the symptoms of neurodegenerative disease, which can improve functioning and quality of life as the disease progresses. Walnuts are one of those super foods.

We will discuss many more nutritional treatments for Alzheimer’s disease in our upcoming documentary, Food For Thought. We also offer vital advice to caregivers, who have a 600% greater chance of contracting the disease than the average person. Learn why. 

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Death rates from heart disease, cancer and other leading causes of death are dropping thanks to advances in medicine and disease management. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease is the one glaring exception. Death rates from Alzheimer’s disease and related forms of neurodegenerative diseases are skyrocketing.

Neurodegenerative diseases are the fastest-growing cause of death today. If we had accurate mortality statistics, we would likely find that Alzheimer’s disease is already the leading cause of death. It will continue to spread around the world—to people of all ages.

There are many factors contributing to the global surge in Alzheimer’s disease. Age and genetics play a role, but it’s smaller than you realize. Due to mismanagement and misinformation, people from some regions of the world are at a higher risk than others. Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest rates in the world. These hot spots speak of an environmental disease not one driven by age and genetics. Women contract the disease at twice the rate of men. Why?

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Hope is on the horizon. These tips can help you and your loved ones beat and treat neurological disease. Prevention is the key.

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

We need your help to push for reforms that can stop the misinformation and mismanagement that are contributing to the global Alzheimer’s disease epidemic. Please contact us to find out how you can help. Write to Gary Chandler gary@crossbow1.com