Caregivers Overwhelmed By Alzheimer’s Disease

eBook Offers Vital Tips For Caregivers, Patients

Neurodegenerative disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. There are no vaccines to prevent it or cure it. Prevention is our best hope and nutrition offers the only proven hope for those who have brain disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). As the name implies, the disease is transmissible and extremely difficult to treat.

The good news is that with the truth, caregivers can safeguard themselves and others, while treating patients with targeted nutrition that helps treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Targeted nutrition also offers promise in preventing brain disease.

A new book by researcher Gary R. Chandler sheds light on tips for aversion and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of neurodegenerative disease. The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). Prion disease is unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from the victim. All tissue is infectious.

Prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices, restaurants and many other places infinitely. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Victims often become infectious long before they appear sick.

Prions kill everything in their path—man or beast. Prions are highly infectious and the bodies of victims become highly infectious long before they look or feel sick. Blood, milk, meat, urine, saliva, mucus, feces and other bodily fluids of victims are contagious.

According to research from Duke University, caregivers of someone with dementia are six times more likely to develop the condition themselves.

Even sophisticated healthcare systems have failed to grasp the severity of prion disease. Unfortunately, hospitals around the world have been sued for spreading CJD to innocent patients. Most health care systems are still misinformed and under-informed about the dangers that CJD patients pose to others. Therefore, these care facilities are exposing others and contributing to a global mismanagement problem.

Alzheimer's disease infectious disease

Only a decade ago, the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might be transmissible between people would have been laughed away. But scientists have now shown that tissues can transmit symptoms of the disease between animals. A new study published in the journal Nature raises additional concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people.

Prion disease is a spectrum disease because of its many mutations and because some victims appear to have a genetic predisposition to resist the disease. Some prions can kill people within weeks of exhibiting clinical symptoms, while others can take years. Others may not fall victim to the disease, but can still carry the pathogen internally and externally. Victims become infectious long before they appear sick. Their bodily fluids proceed to contaminate the world around them with infectious waste.

Alzheimer's disease research

Since prion disease is a spectrum disease, doctors can’t tell the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and CJD. It’s a process of elimination and a shot in the dark. The only definitive diagnosis comes with an autopsy, which rarely happens with neurological disease (concerns over deadly contamination). All doctors are guessing with each diagnosis based on the severity of the symptoms. This problem also complicates the search for accurate statistics about the size and scope of the epidemic.

Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong at least 20 percent of the time. Unfortunately for caregivers and family members, the protocol for patient care and caregiver safety are vastly different for Alzheimer’s patients and CJD patients. The double standards put many stakeholders at risk. It’s reckless to try to distinguish between prion diseases on the spectrum. In other words, treat people with Alzheimer’s disease as though they have CJD. Assume the worst and hope for the best. A deadly prion is a deadly prion.

infectious waste and food contamination

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

Caring For Someone With Alzheimer’s Disease

Nearly 15 million caregivers in the U.S. work with someone who has Alzheimer’s, and approximately 70 percent of Alzheimer’s patients are cared for by relatives and friends. In addition to the truth about transmissibility, these caregivers desperately need guidance on effective treatments. The search for cures has been a total washout.

Fortunately, targeted nutrition offers promise. Some foods increase your risk of contracting brain disease, while some foods help prevent it. Other foods offer the best hope for effective treatment. For example, the eBook explains how walnuts, coconut oil, olive oil, grapes, salmon and hundreds of other foods offer proven results to people with brain disease.

Alzheimer's disease Survival Guide

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting us at risk.

treat Alzheimer's disease

About Gary Chandler

Gary Chandler is an author, advocate and strategist on health and environmental issues.
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