Woodward Tackling Alzheimer’s Disease

Joanne Woodward, legendary actress and widow of actor Paul Newman, is battling Alzheimer’s disease. According to sources close to the family, Woodward faces a grim prognosis.

Woodward’s first film was a post-Civil War Western, Count Three and Pray, in 1955. She continued to move between Hollywood and Broadway, eventually studying in the New York production of Picnic, which featured her future husband Paul Newman. The two were married in 1958, after their work together in the film The Long, Hot Summer. By that time, Woodward had starred in The Three Faces of Eve (1957), for which she won the 1957 Academy Award for Best Actress. One of her favorite roles was in the movie A Big Hand For The Little Lady.

Joanne Woodward Alzheimer's disease

She graduated from Greenville High School in Greenville, South Carolina in 1947. Woodward won many beauty contests as a teenager. She appeared in theatrical productions at Greenville High and in Greenville’s Little Theatre, playing Laura Wingfield in their staging of The Glass Menagerie, directed by Robert Hemphill McLane. She returned to Greenville in 1976, to play Amanda Wingfield in another Little Theatre production of The Glass Menagerie. She had also returned in 1955 for the premiére of her debut movie, Count Three And Pray, at the Paris Theatre on North Main Street. Woodward majored in drama at Louisiana State University, where she was an initiate of Chi Omega sorority, then headed to New York City to perform on the stage.

Joanne Woodward’s health decline comes at a hard time within the family as Paul Newman’s children have reportedly been fighting over their father’s estate. The Paul Newman family is currently at war with each other over the “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” stars multi-billion dollar estate. Newman’s family members are clearly upset that the bulk of his estate was left to his wife Joanne Woodward and his various selected charities. Sources close to the Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward family stated:

“Prior to his death, he gifted each of his five daughters with an inheritance of $5 million. He felt the girls were all successful and didn’t have to rely on family­ money. “But the girls are now suddenly sensitive to how much Joanne is worth, and they’re concerned that she may cut them out of her estate entirely and leave every dime to charity.”

Joanne Woodward

As Joanne Woodward is fighting for her life, the children are battling over the Newman fortune. Joanne Woodward was married to Paul Newman for five decades before he died of lung can­cer in 2008.

Woodward and Newman share three daughters – Nell, 53, Lissy, 51, and Clea, 47. Newman also has two daughters from his first marriage to Jackie Witte, Susan, 59, and Stephanie, 58. Paul Newman was proceeded in death by his son Scott, who died from a drug overdose in 1978 at the age of 28.

Such a shame at this time in her life Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman’s children are fighting over money. It’s anyone’s guess what Joanne Woodward planned in her will.

Neurological diseases known as dementia are the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. Women are twice as likely to contract the disease as men. Some regions of the world are being struck especially hard. The Alzheimer’s disease epidemic is spreading exponentially because of misinformation and mismanagement. Patients, caregivers, family members and millions of other stakeholders deserve the truth. The epidemic is much worse in some regions of the world than others. The reasons will shock you.

Alzheimer's disease and CJD

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Gary Chandler is a prion expert. He is the CEO of Crossbow Communications, author of several books and producer of documentaries about health and environmental issues around the world. Chandler is connecting the dots to the global surge in neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and other forms of prion disease. The scientific name for prion disease is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. The operative word is “transmissible.” Even the global surge in autism appears to be related.