Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Strikes Again In Maine

CJD Often Misdiagnosed As Alzheimer’s Disease

Maine Medical Center confirmed Friday that a patient treated at the hospital carried a rare, dangerous brain illness to which a “small number” of other patients may have been exposed, though the hospital called that risk “exceedingly low.”

The patient has Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, a degenerative brain disorder caused by an infectious type of protein, the hospital said in a statement. CJD is a form of prion disease, which is fatal.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

Hospital officials suspected earlier this week that the patient, who was not identified for privacy reasons, carried the pathogen, based on an initial biopsy result. The National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland confirmed the diagnosis on Friday, according to the statement.

“We are in the process of reaching out to the small number of patients who we think should be notified based on the details of their specific case,” Dr. Joel Botler, chief medical officer at MMC, said in the statement. “Our staff members have been fielding calls from patients who have legitimate concerns and questions about their care. Let me be clear, only a small number of patients who have had surgery at MMC have been exposed to any degree of risk, and that risk is exceedingly low approaching zero.”

CJD transmissible

Transmission of the disease in a hospital setting is “extremely rare,” with no confirmed cases in more than 20 years, the statement said.

Humans can contract prion disease from medical procedures, as the pathogen can survive on surgical tools and other equipment even after standard sterilization. Brain tissue from an infected patient potentially can infect subsequent patients before doctors know it’s there.

MMC is determining which patients were treated before the initial pathology report showing Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and should be notified.

“While the hospital does track surgical equipment used in each case, the decision was made not to rely on tracking and instead make sure that any piece of equipment that could potentially be affected was treated,” Botler said in the statement. “Now that we know this case is confirmed, we can see that our response was 100 percent appropriate and that patients should feel confident in the safety of their care at Maine Medical Center.”

As a precaution, the hospital rescheduled approximately 150 elective surgeries Wednesday and Thursday while staff decontaminated surgical equipment and facilities in accordance with guidelines set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the hospital said.

Alzheimer's disease research

In the meantime, other Maine hospitals loaned equipment so MMC could perform emergency surgeries.

To treat metal instruments contaminated with prions, hospitals have to put them in an autoclave and heat the tools to 121 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes, according to CDC protocols. That’s much more than is required to kill bacteria and viruses.

But even that doesn’t always work. Prions can survive the superheating, though it does weaken them, according to a report in Scientific American.

Another reason why prion disease poses such a risk is that it has a long incubation period. The time between when a person is exposed to when they start feeling symptoms can range from months to years. That means a patient with the disease can arrive at the hospital and show no symptoms. It may not be until they’re on the operating table for another reason that doctors spot signs of trouble. Or the medical staff may spot no red flags at all, only to discover later that the patient was infected. In the meantime, other patients can be exposed to the contaminated tools and more.

infectious waste and food contamination

Prion disease is distinct from other infectious diseases in that it’s not caused by a bacteria, virus or fungus but by abnormal proteins called prions. They can cause other proteins in the brain to fold abnormally, essentially leaving the organ full of holes like a sponge. That brain damage leads to memory impairment, dementia, personality changes and difficulty moving, among other symptoms. The incurable disease usually progresses very quickly and is always fatal, according to the CDC.

Prion disease refers to a family of progressive disorders that affect humans and animals. The most common form of it among humans is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, which can arise spontaneously, for no known reason. A variant form of it is caused by eating meat from cattle infected with another prion disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, also known as mad cow disease. (Editor’s Note: In deer, elk, moose and reindeer, prion disease has been dubbed chronic wasting disease. It’s time to put the species-specific names aside. A deadly prion is a deadly prion.)

CJD is rare, estimated to affect about one out of every million people worldwide each year, according to the World Health Organization. About 250 cases are diagnosed each year in the U.S. but thousands of other cases are suspected to go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

In 2014, a Kennebunk woman who worked as a nurse at Maine Medical Center died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, according her family.

Sandi Kennedy CJD

And in 2013, 15 people in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut were warned that they may have been exposed to the disease through potentially contaminated medical equipment.

Editor’s Note: The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, these brain diseases are on the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The bodily fluids of TSE victims are infectious and deadly. This infectious waste is now an environmental nightmare.

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. The most savvy neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risks. They are making diagnoses from across the room. Unfortunately, caregivers aren’t warned accordingly.

CJD behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

Experts claim that at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive prion disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death.

Infectious Disease News via http://bangordailynews.com/2016/11/11/news/state/case-of-rare-infectious-brain-illness-confirmed-at-maine-med/?ref=comments

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Infectious Disease, Prion Disease | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Asians At Higher Risk For Dementia

DNA Analysis Reveals Key Genetic Mutations, Therapies

By Joana Fernandes, PhD

Researchers reviewed the novel mutations found in genes associated with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease in Asian countries, arguing that identifying disease-associated mutations greatly contributes to the knowledge of the cause and effect of the disease. This information is also essential to develop preventive and therapeutic strategies.

Alzheimer's disease research

The study, “Mutations, Associated With Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease, Discovered In Asian Countries,” was published in the journal of Clinical Interventions in Aging. 

Alzheimer’s disease can be classified into the early-onset and late-onset types. The early-onset form is more rare and hereditary, developing before the age of 65. Essentially, three genes are known to be involved in this form of the disease: APPPSEN1, and PSEN2.

APP encodes the amyloid precursor protein which, when cleaved, will become the beta-amyloid protein, whose toxic accumulation is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s. The other two genes, PSEN1 and PSEN2, encode proteins that cleave the amyloid precursor protein, contributing to the formation of the beta-amyloid protein. Mutations in these three genes may promote beta-amyloid production and accumulation.

Here, researchers reviewed all of the known mutations in these three genes that were discovered in Asian countries, such as Japan, Korea, and China. According to the authors, 30 novel Asian mutations were found in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 comparing Caucasian and Asian patients. The unfolding epidemic could be more severe in these regions of the world.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Most mutations associated with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease have been detected in PSEN1, and novel PSEN1 mutations were recently identified in patients from various parts of the world, including Asia. Other studies discovered what were probably pathogenic PSEN2 mutations in Korea and China.

“Several mutations were discovered in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 that could contribute to disease progression,” the authors wrote. “Most of these mutations are associated with familial [early-onset Alzheimer’s]. However, several [new] cases of [Alzheimer’s] were reported in patients without any family history of dementia.”

“The majority of pathogenic mutations were found in PSEN1 gene,” they added. “Several PSEN1 mutations could be associated with early-onset [Alzheimer’s], which occurs at the age of 40 years, and with rapid and aggressive dementia progression. Mutations in APP and PSEN2 are quite rare but are possible causative factors [for early-onset disease]. Pathogenic mutations could result in disease onset at the age of 40-65 years.”

Although there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease, potential therapeutic approaches might be successful in early stages of the disease. The problem is that diagnosing the disease before clinical symptoms occur is complicated.

The identification of proteins and genes that can act as biomarkers for disease onset is essential to improve diagnosis, especially given that several genes have already been described as causative or risk factor genes for dementia.

For this reason, knowing which mutations are associated with Alzheimer’s disease may become a powerful strategy to predict the development of this disease before the appearance of symptoms, and allow the start of prevention therapies in patients.

Alzheimer’s Disease News Source: https://alzheimersnewstoday.com/2016/10/19/novel-mutations-linked-early-onset-alzheimers-found-asian-countries

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis, Alzheimer's Disease Prevention, Alzheimer's Disease Research, Alzheimer's Disease Treatment | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Urine Test Can Diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Prions Fueling A Public Health Disaster

Urine can be used to test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Unfortunately, it also is a pathway that spreads prion disease among mammals.

infectious waste and food contamination

The Medical Research Council team is working on a simple test. They claim that their prototype test still needs honing before it could be used routinely. Currently there is no easy test available for this rare but fatal brain condition. Instead, doctors have to take a sample of spinal fluid or brain tissue, or wait for a post-mortem after death. What they look for is tell-tale deposits of abnormal proteins called prions, which cause the brain damage.

Building on earlier US work, Dr. Graham Jackson and colleagues, from University College London, have now found it is also possible to detect prions in urine. This might offer a way to diagnose CJD rapidly and earlier, they say, although there is no cure.

CJD is a rare, but fatal degenerative brain disorder caused by abnormal proteins called prions that damage brain cells. In the 1990s it became clear that a brain disease could be passed from cows to humans (it can also be passed from humans to other mammals). Since then, officials have kept a close check on how many people have become sick or died from CJD. There is no known cure.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

The study looked at urine samples from 162 people. Of these:

  • 91 were healthy controls
  • 34 had neurological disease that was not thought to be caused by CJD
  • 37 had a diagnosis of CJD (20 of these were sporadic CJD)

The urine test gave no “false-positive” results – meaning it did not falsely suggest there was CJD in any of the patients known not to have the disease. But it was less reliable when it came to detecting actual cases. It accurately detected just under half of the sporadic CJD patients and even fewer of the vCJD patients. The researchers hope they will be able to improve the test further so it can reliably detect all types of CJD.

“Although there is currently no cure for this disease, an accurate and early diagnosis is extremely important for patients and their families, said Dr. Jackson. “In the future, as trials of potential therapies become available, the earlier a patient can be diagnosed the more effective any treatment is likely to be. This test could be a critical step forward.”

Editor’s Note: Prion disease is a spectrum disease that includes Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease and is likely a contributing factor in the global rise in autism. Victims are infectious long before they exhibit symptoms. Misinformation and mismanagement of sewage and wastewater are contributing to the global epidemic in neurodegenerative disease. As more people get the disease, the waste stream becomes even deadler. It’s time to regulate wastewater streams, including biosolids, as infectious waste and it’s time to enforce the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.

Neurodegenerative News via http://www.bbc.com/news/health-37541550?post_id=10153608943738725_10154203430888725

Posted in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Diagnosis, Disease Transmission, Infectious Disease, Prion Disease, Sewage Sludge | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Pomegranate Seeds Treat Neurodegenerative Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment Delivers Powerful Antioxidant

Granalix BioTechnologies has developed a new treatment for those with Alzheimer’s disease. The company announced the availability of GranaGard™ a food supplement based on pomegranate oil that helps prevent neurodegeneration.

Alzheimer's disease prevention tips

GranaGard, is a submicron Pomegranate Seed Oil (PSO) emulsion, and is an innovative formulation of one of the strongest natural antioxidants, Punicic acid (an Omega 5 lipid), which constitutes 80 percent of PSO. The novel patented formulation was shown to delay disease onset and prevent neuronal death in a model of genetic prion disease (a form of Mad Cow Disease)[i] and to reduce disease burden in a mouse model of Multiple Sclerosis[ii], while showing no toxicity after long term administration. In both diseases, GranaGard administration results in reduction of brain lipid oxidation, which is caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

Prof. Ruth Gabizon, Founder and acting CEO of Granalix BioTechnologies, explained, “Reactive Oxygen species (ROS) are chemically active molecules that can lead to significant damage to cells, and in particular in the central nervous system. It is therefore widely accepted that this chemical agent contributes to chronic inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. And while anti-oxidants that can counteract ROS are ubiquitously present in a healthy human diet, their activity is limited by chemical degradation, poor bioavailability, reduced distribution to the CNS, and sub-pharmacological doses.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

To overcome these limitations, we generated GranaGard, a novel neuroprotective formulation with high bioavailability. In addition to its protective role in subjects at risk of neurodegenerative conditions, GranaGard is expected to be effective for general neurological wellbeing for the larger public. We are also currently testing GranaGard for its effect in various non-neurological diseases and as a protective agent during intense exercise.”

PSO submicron droplets have several advantages. First, the nano formulation may avoid the first passage of the oil through the liver, thereby enhancing the availability of the droplets to other organs such as the CNS. GranaGard is then able to enter the brain and protect membrane lipids from ROS attacks that occur as a result of both every-day efforts and pathological events. In vivo, Punicic Acid is metabolized into Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), a compound known for its neuroprotective and other beneficial effects. When mice are given the GranaGard formulation, CLA was found to accumulate in the brain and can directly exert its neuroprotective effect.

Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, Parkinson’s or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are late onset brain disorders that together affect millions of people around the globe. Alzheimer’s disease is already the 5th leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older in the US. It’s also the fastest-growing cause of death globally. Currently, there are no preventive or curative treatments for these conditions.

“GranaGard can currently be purchased at the Company’s website. We are seeking additional partners for worldwide distribution,” added Prof. Gabizon. GranaGard™ is produced by Supherb and can be purchased at the Company’s website at http://www.granalix.com.

Granalix BioTechnologies focuses on developing science-based novel formulations of natural antioxidants that can be used for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions. The Company was established in 2014 by Prof. Ruth Gabizon from the Department of Neurology at Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel and Prof. Shlomo Magdassi at the Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, the Institute of Chemistry and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease Prevention, Alzheimer's Disease Treatment, Nutrition | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

New Drug Offers Promise Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Treatment Purges Plaque Deposits Within Brain

A new drug that can treat Alzheimer’s disease is finally on the horizon after scientists proved they can clear the sticky plaques from the brain which cause dementia and halt mental decline. Hailed as the best news in dementia research for 25 years, the breakthrough is said to be a potential game changer for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

aducanumab treats Alzheimer's disease

Red areas represent plaque deposits targeted by aducanumab. Click to enlarge.

Scientists said they were amazed to find that patients treated with the highest dose of the antibody drug aducanumab experienced an almost complete clearance of the amyloid plaques that prevent brain cells communicating, leading to irreversible memory loss and cognitive decline.

Crucially they also found that after six months of the treatment, patients stopped deteriorating compared with those taking a placebo, suggesting that their dementia had been halted.

If shown to be effective in larger trials, the first drug to treat dementia could be available in just a few years.

“The results of this clinical study make us optimistic that we can potentially make a great step forward in treating Alzheimer’s disease,” said Prof Roger Nitsch, at the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Zurich. “In the high dose group the amyloid has almost completely disappeared. The effect size of this drug is unprecedented. Despite it being a small sample, there appeared to be a slowing of cognitive decline and functional decline. The group with a high degree of amyloid removal were basically stable. If we could reproduce this, it would be terrific.”

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Dr. Alfred Sandrock, from the Massachusetts-based biotech company Biogen, which is hoping to bring the drug to market, said: “This is the best news that we have had in 25 years and it brings new hope to patients with this disease.”

There are currently 850,000 people living with dementia in Britain, a figure that is expected to rise to one million by 2025 and two million by 2050. There are more than 50 million people battling the disease today. Despite a high death rate, the population of those afflicted with the disease is expected to soar over the next decade.

The most common kind of neurodegenerative disease is Alzheimer’s disease, but scientists have been unable to reach consensus about the cause of the condition, and despite more than 400 drug trials, nothing has been effective. Current treatments can reduce symptoms to some extent but doctors have nothing that can halt or slow progression of the disease.

Aducanumab is a treatment made up of antibodies, tiny y-shaped proteins that latch on to dangerous substances in the body, acting like flags, showing the immune system what to clear away.

Scientists tested various human immune cells with amyloid in a laboratory until they found one which produced an antibody that broke up the plaques. They then cloned it in large numbers for the new therapy, which is given intravenously just once a month.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

In the trial, which was reported in the journal Nature, scientists tested varying levels of the drug over a year, as well as giving one group a placebo. They found that more amyloid was removed as the dose increased. Brain scans of those given the highest dose shown virtually no amyloid left at all.

The drug is likely to be most effective for patients in the very earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease, or those who have not yet begun to show symptoms. Several universities are working on early blood tests for dementia which could pick the disease up a decade or more before the first physical signs appear.

Dementia experts and charities said that the breakthrough offered real hope for the future treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. There are now two large phase-three clinical studies taking place to further evaluate safety and efficacy on a total of 2,700 patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease and researchers are currently recruiting British participants.

“These results provide tantalizing evidence that a new class of drug to treat the disease may be on the horizon,” said Dr David Reynolds, chief scientific officer at Alzheimer’s Research UK.

“The findings suggest that aducanumab may slow memory and thinking decline in people with early Alzheimer’s and, although the analysis is only exploratory in this early trial, it paints a positive picture for ongoing trials with the drug.”

caregivers Alzheimer's disease

Encouragingly, this treatment also appeared to slow memory decline, demonstrating that amyloid formation is a direct or indirect cause of memory loss. This has been suspected for some time, but has never been proven in humans.

“These findings could be a game changer if the effects on memory decline can be confirmed in more extensive follow-on studies.”

The Alzheimer’s Society said the “most compelling” evidence from the trial was the fact that more amyloid was cleared when patients took higher doses of the drug.

Dr James Pickett, head of research at the charity, said: “No existing treatments for Alzheimer’s directly interfere with the disease process, and so a drug that actually slows the progress of the disease by clearing amyloid would be a significant step.

“While there were hints that it might have an effect on the symptoms of the disease, we need to see the results from further, larger research trials to understand whether this is the case. These larger trials are now under way, including in the UK, and due to finish in 2020.”

Prof Richard Morris, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh, said: “We cannot yet say we have a cure for Alzheimer’s, as this is only a first step … but the importance of this first step cannot be understated.

“Let’s keep our fingers crossed for success in the next steps.”

Alzheimer’s Disease News via http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/09/01/alzheimers-new-drug-that-halts-mental-decline-is-best-news-for-d/

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease Cure, Alzheimer's Disease Treatment, Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Wildlife Contracting Brain Disease From Humans

Chronic Wasting Disease Further Proof Of Infectious Disease

Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other forms of neurodegenerative disease are collectively becoming the leading cause of death around the world. Brain disease also continues to expand in wildlife. Is there a connection?

biosolids land application contaminates food water

Keep reading to find out why:

  • Alzheimer’s disease is part of a spectrum disease known as prion disease, which also includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The spectrum also is known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE);
  • Alzheimer’s disease is an infectious prion disease, which is often misdiagnosed and undiagnosed. Millions of diagnoses are being suppressed by physicians;
  • The bodily fluids of those with prion disease are infectious;
  • Wastewater treatment plants are contaminating our food and water supplies by spreading deadly prions via sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater. The risk assessments involving these facilities and their by-products were prepared before prions were discovered and characterized;
  • Wildlife, sea mammals, livestock and people are contracting prion disease from mismanaged sewage; 
  • Caregivers are in harm’s way because of disease mismanagement; 
  • It’s time to reclassify sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater as infectious waste; and 
  • It’s time to defend our food, water and air from infectious waste by enforcing the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act Of 2002 and similar laws around the world.

The Brain Disease Epidemic

Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now. Millions more will contract the disease this year, while just as many will go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

Thanks to misinformation and the mismanagement of infectious waste and bodily fluids, people of all ages are now exposed to an expanding spectrum of brain disease. So are other mammals.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, these brain diseases are part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible.

Pandora’s Lunchbox

Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The bodily fluids of people with prion disease are infectious. Prions are the X factor in the global epidemic.

infectious waste and food contamination

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. Prions are an infectious form of glycoprotein that can propagate throughout the body. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease. TSEs also have the potential of being transmitted from humans to animals. The most common example is chronic wasting disease (CWD) among deer species. Sick wildlife are a canary in the proverbial coal mine. CWD is part of a larger epidemic of neurological disease that is killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. The warning signals are being ignored.

land application sewage sludge and chronic wasting disease

CWD was first detected in deer in North America. Then it was detected in a variety of other animals, including an elephant at the Oakland zoo. It’s been found in a variety of animals across the United States and Canada. All hypotheses seem to center around contaminated feed and deer farmers. Then the deer spread the disease via nose-to-nose contact. Those theories were just rocked by the discovery of CWD in Norway in moose and reindeer. The disease didn’t jump the Atlantic from the Americas. However, Norway dumps tons of infectious waste on land every year–infectious waste from people with prion disease.

It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when. The medical community prefers to ignore the topic. The legal industry is about to have a bonanza because negligence is the rule and not the exception regarding Alzheimer’s disease and the mismanagement of infectious waste. Savvy neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risks. Unfortunately, caregivers aren’t warned accordingly.

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Wastewater treatment doesn’t touch prions. In fact, these facilities are now helping incubate and distribute prions via solids and wastewater released. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

chronic wasting disease

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. Unfortunately, the CDC quietly took prions off the list because the regulation criminalized entire industries and several reckless practices.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation.

Prions shed from humans are the most deadly. They demand more respect than radiation. They’re being ignored by regulators and industry alike. As such, food and water sources are being contaminated with the deadliest forms of prions. Municipal water systems can’t stop them from reaching water taps in millions of homes. Filtration doesn’t phase them.

Alzheimer's disease research

Scientists have shown that infected tissues can transmit prion disease between animals. There is no species barrier. A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence. There is no evidence that Alzheimer’s disease is not infectious.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

biosolids land application

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. Failure to account for known risks is negligent. Crops for humans and livestock grown grown in sewage sludge absorb prions and become infectious. We’re all vulnerable to Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease right now due to widespread denial and mismanagement.

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. If sick deer are serving as a canary in a coal mine, what is this infectious waste doing to livestock and humans?

mad cow disease

It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations. Safer alternatives exist. Please join our coalition for reform.

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease Causes, Alzheimer's Disease Prevention, Chronic Wasting Disease, Contagion | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Caregivers Overwhelmed By Alzheimer’s Disease

eBook Offers Vital Tips For Caregivers, Patients

Neurodegenerative disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. There are no vaccines to prevent it or cure it. Prevention is our best hope and nutrition offers the only proven hope for those who have brain disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). As the name implies, the disease is transmissible and extremely difficult to treat.

The good news is that with the truth, caregivers can safeguard themselves and others, while treating patients with targeted nutrition that helps treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Targeted nutrition also offers promise in preventing brain disease.

A new book by researcher Gary R. Chandler sheds light on tips for aversion and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of neurodegenerative disease. The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). Prion disease is unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from the victim. All tissue is infectious.

Prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices, restaurants and many other places infinitely. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Victims often become infectious long before they appear sick.

Prions kill everything in their path—man or beast. Prions are highly infectious and the bodies of victims become highly infectious long before they look or feel sick. Blood, milk, meat, urine, saliva, mucus, feces and other bodily fluids of victims are contagious.

According to research from Duke University, caregivers of someone with dementia are six times more likely to develop the condition themselves.

Even sophisticated healthcare systems have failed to grasp the severity of prion disease. Unfortunately, hospitals around the world have been sued for spreading CJD to innocent patients. Most health care systems are still misinformed and under-informed about the dangers that CJD patients pose to others. Therefore, these care facilities are exposing others and contributing to a global mismanagement problem.

Alzheimer's disease infectious disease

Only a decade ago, the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might be transmissible between people would have been laughed away. But scientists have now shown that tissues can transmit symptoms of the disease between animals. A new study published in the journal Nature raises additional concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people.

Prion disease is a spectrum disease because of its many mutations and because some victims appear to have a genetic predisposition to resist the disease. Some prions can kill people within weeks of exhibiting clinical symptoms, while others can take years. Others may not fall victim to the disease, but can still carry the pathogen internally and externally. Victims become infectious long before they appear sick. Their bodily fluids proceed to contaminate the world around them with infectious waste.

Alzheimer's disease research

Since prion disease is a spectrum disease, doctors can’t tell the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and CJD. It’s a process of elimination and a shot in the dark. The only definitive diagnosis comes with an autopsy, which rarely happens with neurological disease (concerns over deadly contamination). All doctors are guessing with each diagnosis based on the severity of the symptoms. This problem also complicates the search for accurate statistics about the size and scope of the epidemic.

Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong at least 20 percent of the time. Unfortunately for caregivers and family members, the protocol for patient care and caregiver safety are vastly different for Alzheimer’s patients and CJD patients. The double standards put many stakeholders at risk. It’s reckless to try to distinguish between prion diseases on the spectrum. In other words, treat people with Alzheimer’s disease as though they have CJD. Assume the worst and hope for the best. A deadly prion is a deadly prion.

infectious waste and food contamination

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

Caring For Someone With Alzheimer’s Disease

Nearly 15 million caregivers in the U.S. work with someone who has Alzheimer’s, and approximately 70 percent of Alzheimer’s patients are cared for by relatives and friends. In addition to the truth about transmissibility, these caregivers desperately need guidance on effective treatments. The search for cures has been a total washout.

Fortunately, targeted nutrition offers promise. Some foods increase your risk of contracting brain disease, while some foods help prevent it. Other foods offer the best hope for effective treatment. For example, the eBook explains how walnuts, coconut oil, olive oil, grapes, salmon and hundreds of other foods offer proven results to people with brain disease.

Alzheimer's disease Survival Guide

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting us at risk.

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Alzheimer’s Disease Research Targets Prions

More Evidence That Prions Cause Alzheimer’s Disease

ProMIS Neurosciences highlighted the growing mountain of research, which calls out Amyloid-beta and Tau prions (proteins), as the root cause for Alzheimer’s disease. The company released a white paper today compiling the scientific data as the basis for new treatments.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

In the white paper, the company provided a concise overview of empirical evidence from a number of leading researchers, much of it recent, that supports the methodology of selectively targeting the prion variants of Amyloid-beta and Tau.

Amyloid-beta (Aβ) acts as a causative agent in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers also have discovered that depletion of Aβ reversed cerebral amyloidosis and associated pathology in susceptible mice.

Other research points to the likelihood that prion-like oligomers of misfolded Aβ mediate neurotoxicity and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. In the Cleary et al 2004; Jin et al 2011 studies, scientists concluded that while the presence of Aβ plaque was the calling card of Alzheimer’s disease, the synaptic loss and neurodegenerative spread of the disease were primarily mediated by soluble oligomers of misfolded Aβ rather than plaque.

Alzheimer's disease research

Even more research contends that the progressive nature of Alzheimer’s disease comes from the formation and spread of Aβ prions. As found in the Khan et al 2014 study, the self-propagation of these Aβ prions follows the stereotypical progression of AD. The prion-like spread is well-documented in animal models.

A growing body of data also indicates that the selective targeting of Aβ prions offers distinct advantages over the broadly reactive Aβ antibodies currently in clinical testing. This specificity of Aβ prion neutralization is expected to increase efficacy by mitigating “target distraction.” This means that treating physicians can preserve normal Aβ function in the patient as well as decreasing the risk of edema and vascular adverse effects.

To achieve this precision medicine approach to Alzheimer’s therapy, ProMIS employed two proprietary computational discovery technologies, ProMIS™ and Collective Coordinates to predict regions of protein most likely to unfold based on thermodynamic stability. This means the company was able to identify six predicted disease-specific epitopes of Aβ prions that would act as homing beacons for antibody therapy. Antibodies have been raised from five of the epitopes and are currently undergoing screening and validation for prion-specific binding and functional activity.

Read more at http://www.stockhouse.com/news/newswire/2016/06/23/promis-t-pmn-white-paper-affirms-a%CE%B2-and-tau-prions-as-alzheimer-s-root-cause#u1wxD4DCfkxcIGMw.99

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Hallucinogen Offers Promise Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Neurogenesis A Possible Treatment For Alzheimer’s Disease

Scientists have discovered that a hallucinogenic substance from the Amazon stimulates the birth of new brains cells and could lead to treatment for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease.

The tea called ayahuasca, is also used a as traditional spiritual medicine in ceremonies in Peru. The Saint Pau Hospital Barcelona, which worked in collaboration with the Beckley Foundation and Spanish National Research Council in Madrid, has released the findings from a study investigating the potential of ayahuasca to promote neurogenesis – which is the development of new brain cells. The investigators believe that these findings will open up a new avenue of research that may help develop drugs to treat diseases, such as like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and addiction.

Ayahuasca and Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Jordi Riba, lead investigator, presented preliminary data, at the Interdisciplinary Conference on Psychedelic Research in Amsterdam at the weekend. Results showed two compounds – harmine and tetrahydro harmine – which are found in the hallucinogenic tea, potently stimulated the transformation of stem cells into new neurons.

Amanda Feilding, director of the Beckley Foundation said: “The images from the Beckley/Saint Pau collaboration showing the birth of new neurons are very interesting and suggest that ayahuasca could lead to a new approach in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.”

Experts have believed for years that the brain doesn’t make neurons during adulthood. In the 1990s, research changed this finding, showing that new neurons are generated throughout adult life in two regions of the human brain: the area around the ventricles and in the hippocampus.

ayahuasca and Alzheimer's disease treatment

The hippocampus, which is thought to be the center of emotion and the autonomic nervous system, plays a key role in memory. Its function declines with age and in neurological disorders. Under normal conditions, the rate of the birth of new neurons is very low, and it cannot keep up with the rate of neural death that occurs in diseases such such as Alzheimer’s disease.

In the study, neural stem cells were isolated from the hippocampus of adult mice. The stem cells were grown in the lab and substances that are present in ayahuasca were added to the cultures and compared with a saline placebo. Scientists have described the results as impressive, with ayahuasca substances stimulating the transformation of stem cells into new neurons.

Dr. Riba has studied ayahuasca for 20 years. Ayahuasca is a potent hallucinogenic brew used by shamans in the Amazon for centuries for medical and spiritual purposes. Obtained from a mixture of jungle plants, its popularity around the world has hugely increased in recent years, as an aid to spiritual exploration, psychotherapy and healing.

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatments Update via http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/680497/alzheimer-s-disease-brain-cells-treatment-halluicongenic-tea-Amazon

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Deaths From Neurological Disease Rising Sharply

Neurodegenerative Disease The Fastest-Growing Cause Of Death

By Dr. Russell Blaylock, M.D.

A new study that was recently published in the journal Surgical Neurology International confirms what I wrote about several years ago — that the incidence of neurological disease and the deaths from these disorders has risen dramatically in the last few decades.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

This study, which examined death rates from all neurological disorders from 1989 to 2010, found that there was a dramatic increase that affected both male and female Americans between the ages of 55 and 74. It also tracked those people who were 75 and older.

In the 55-74 age group in America, neurological deaths increased 82 percent among males and 48 percent in females. In the same age group from other countries, the rate increased just two percent and one percent, respectively.

For those over age 75 outside of the U.S., the incidence of neurological deaths for males and females rose 117 and 143 percent, respectively. However, for the same population in the United States, those death rates increased an astounding 368 for men and 663 percent for women.

This dramatic rise in neurological deaths was not a common phenomenon associated with other diseases. Over the same period, death rates with other diseases, such as strokes, heart attacks, and cancer actually dropped.

The authors of the paper concluded that this drastic rise in neurological deaths was due to environmental causes, which include:

  • Increased exposure to industrial and agricultural chemicals;
  • Widespread use of the pesticide Round-up;
  • Elevated exposure to mercury, aluminum, and other toxic metals; and
  • Poor diets featuring high sugar and high intakes of oxidized vegetable oils.

Fortunately, we are finding that a change in diet, avoiding exposure to these toxic chemicals, and using special plant extracts, as well as vitamins and minerals can significantly reduce the risk of death from neurological disorders.

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Read more: Neurological Disorders and Mortality

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