Alzheimer’s and Mad-Cow Disease Share Same Pathogen

Prion Disease Impacts Most Mammals

Not surprisingly, Mad-Cow disease, the medical term Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), has been rampant in the U.S. for decades.  The human form of Mad Cow is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).  The USDA and FDA have done a very good job of keeping this under wraps, as well as displaying a healthy disregard for human life by their neglect as well as their silence. The testing on cattle raised for food in the U.S. is ‘careless’ and ‘irresponsible’ according to The World Health Organization (WHO).

chronic wasting disease

Testing one cow out of every 2,000 cows is seriously negligent. Because of this fact, no one knows how many infected cattle enter the human food chain; however it is certain it leads to CJD and Alzheimer’s.

WHO has issued a warning stating that the U.S. is violating the guidelines set forth for the prevention of BSE or Mad-Cow disease making its way into the human population. WHO states that the U.S. is inadequately testing the brains of human dementia victims and is likely missing hundreds of human cases of Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (CJD), caused by none other than Mad-Cow disease.

mad cow disease

The warning goes on to state that the feeding of infected animals to other animals must be ceased immediately. The feeding of slaughterhouse waste, including blood, feathers and excrement, to other farmed animals is causing major health risks to all who eat beef, or any other farmed animal. Deer, elk, sheep, pigs and chickens can all carry this disease in different forms.

Prions and Alzheimer's disease

CJD and Alzheimer’s disease are caused by an infectious prion, which is not a virus. A prion is a protein, but a mutated protein that is somewhat different in shape. These prions fold into an abnormal pattern, at which time they begin killing off brain cells by the millions.

Steven Strittmatter, Professor of Neurology at Yale University, comments, “It’s too bizarre that these two diseases would share this common protein.”

Further, a well-known physician said, “The most frequent misdiagnosis of CJD among the elderly is Alzheimer’s disease. Neither CJD nor Alzheimer’s can be conclusively diagnosed without a brain biopsy, and the symptoms and pathology of both diseases overlap.” Michael Greger, M.D.

The gestation period for this prion can be years or even decades. The problem with this is that many people infected will not even show signs of the disease for years, and the final death toll may not show up until it’s too late to actually do something about the rest of the population. Also, since CJD is often mis-diagnosed, getting the true picture will be difficult.

Regrettably, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders indicates that there is not one single diagnostic test for detecting CJD. The only way to confirm a diagnosis of CJD is by brain biopsy or autopsy. The biopsy is a dangerous procedure because it means removing a part of a person’s brain, and getting the part that is infected is not likely.   And, when testing in either autopsy or biopsy, surgeons performing the test have to take extreme care to be certain they don’t become infected themselves. Strict surgical and disinfection procedures must be followed to perform this kind of test.

I’d venture to say that most doctors would do just about anything BUT this, in order to avoid the risks involved, as well as the time and expense; hence – misdiagnosis.

Source: http://www.opednews.com/articles/Prevent-Alzheimer-s-Diseas-by-Tina-Volpe-121222-380.html

About Gary Chandler

Gary Chandler is an author, advocate and strategist on health and environmental issues.
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